Have COVID-19 questions? ADA offers extensive resources, webinars for dentists

The American Dental Association is committed to helping the dental community navigate the unprecedented crisis of COVID-19. Their most up-to-date information regarding can be found at ADA.org/virus.

On March 20, 2020, the ADA teamed with leading infection control experts from the Organization for Safety, Asepsis, and Prevention (OSAP) to provide the dental community with practical guidance and education.

The first step: providing extensive resources and webinars. View an entire page of their recorded webinars here

An example of one of the videos: 

Dental professionals are invited to frequently check this page for additional webinars.

On which other topics does the ADA share COVID-19 updates, webinars?

  • Current Infection Control Protocols and Procedures
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Sanitizing Operatory Rooms and Equipment
  • Aerosol
  • Pre-Treatment Mouth Rinses and Daily Hygiene
  • Protecting Patients and Dental Staff

And the presenters are…

Kathy Eklund, RDH, MHP

Eve Cuny, MS, the Director of Environmental Health and Safety and Associate Professor at University of the Pacific, Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco, California where she is also Assistant Dean for Global Relations. 

Kathy Eklund, RDH, MHP, the Director of Occupational Health and Safety, and the Forsyth Research Subject and Patient Safety Advocate at The Forsyth Institute. 

Ready for webinars and updates?

Click here.

7 months + 2 dentists with determination = 'Wow' factor in Minnesota.

Sometimes, the best motivation can be proving to yourself and others that you can accomplish a lofty goal.

For Dr. Krista Bauer, Dr. Kelly Stark, and Dr. Dietrich Lawrenz at Champlin Family Dental, this was one of many factors that inspired them to see their new construction in Minnesota through to the last stroke of calming green paint.

“We were motivated to go through with this build because people in our lives told us we couldn’t.”

Dr. Krista Bauer

A top priority in the planning: space, space, and more space. The result of their vision: 7,000 square feet of excellence and multi-discipline for their patients, administrative and clinical teams, as well as room for storage and practice growth. The new construction, completed in seven months, allowed them to accomodate a new neighbor — an orthodontist tenant.

How it all began…

In 2017, Drs. Bauer and Stark, former dental-school students at the University of Minnesota, decided to join forces and create a shared practice. A Benco Build Your Future Workshop, conducted by dentist/designer Dr. Tristan Hamilton, helped the duo’s ideas coalesce.

“Eric Meiners brought us to the seminar and it was perfect for us,” said Dr. Stark of their Friendly Benco Rep.

“Our major vision was to have universal rooms set up with high-speed handpieces, Cavitrons, X-ray units, everything,” Dr. Bauer told Incisal Edge magazine in an interview earlier this year.
“The women speaking at the workshop told us that our rooms needed to be universal, and they solidified what we wanted but couldn’t execute.”

(Starting a Pinterest board of their ideas from the workshop gave them a central repository for design inspiration as well.)

They sought a refined, calming atmosphere that delivered “wow” factor but not in an “over the top” way.

Green: a color of calm.

To match their logo and achieve a calming vibe, the decided on neutral palette with green accents throughout the practice.

One of her favorite moments Dr. Stark recalls, was seeing the Champlin Dental team’s reaction to the finished office after the completion of the seven-month process.

“Once the office was finished, we let them in one by one and took pictures of them seeing it for the first time.”

Dr. Kelly Stark

Their reception area, chandelier, color scheme and space (12 rooms!) receive the most positive commentary from their patients and staff, says Dr. Stark.

The doctors offer advice on the construction or renovation of a dental practice:

“Find the right team — from architect, to contractor, to banker, and real estate agent. Trust your team!”

Dr. Krista Bauer

To learn more about the Champlin Family Dental, click here.

Ready to redefine your design?

For expert advice, contact the CenterPoint Design team at 1.800.GOBENCO.

Champlin Family Dental Design Credits
Interior Designer: Bob Karkela, Architect: Bob Shaffer / Foundation Architects, Equipment Specialist: Tom Jorissen / Benco Dental, Friendly Benco Rep: Eric Meiners

Dr. Krista Bauer, Dr. Dietrich R. Lawrenz, Dr. Kelly Stark

About the Doctors

Dr. Krista Bauer, earned a B.A. in Biomedical Science and DDS from University of Minnesota. Named to the Minneapolis/ St. Paul Top Dentist Hall of Fame, Dr. Bauer practices general and cosmetic dentistry, including implants, veneers, and new smile designs. She and her three children reside in Maple Grove, Minnesota.

Dr. Kelly Stark, earned a B.A. in Chemistry and German from St. Olaf College and dental degree from University of Minnesota. Dr. Stark enjoys many facets of the dental field, including restorative, crowns, implants, and esthetic dentistry. She is married to a fellow dentist, and together they raise their 9-year-old twin sons in Edina, Minnesota.

Dr. Dietrich R. Lawrenz received his dental degree from the University of Minnesota and went on to complete his medical degree and oral and maxillofacial surgery residency in Houston, Texas. Dr. Lawrenz has been in private practice since 1998 and involved in the Cleft Lip and Palate teams at the University of Minnesota and Minneapolis Children’s Hospital. He and his wife Corinne are raising their three boys together in the Twin Cities.

Coping During Crisis? Join a free March 25 webinar from Dental Intelligence & Benco Dental

The Coronavirus pandemic has dealt all employers with never-before-heard-of challenges. Understandably, there are many questions and concerns, and a complimentary CE webinar Wednesday answers many of them. For starters:
* What’s the interplay between vacation time, sick leave, PTO and unemployment benefits?
* How does the new/pending legislation affect dentists?
* What should be on the checklist to shut down the office for an extended period?
* What is telehealth and how does it work?
* How should my practice shift marketing focus over the next six months?
* What is the best way to host a virtual team meeting?

On March 25, five experts in the dental and business professions — Tim Twigg, Laurie Owens, Fred Joyal, and Benco’s own Linda Anderson and Bob Zamrock — will share solutions when Benco Practice Coaching and Dental Intelligence join forces to host the complimentary CE webinar.

From 1 to 5 p.m. EST., event hosts Kay Huff and Curtis Marshall will welcome opening guest Chuck Cohen, Benco Dental Managing Director. Four Continuing Education credits will be issued to anyone who participates in all four hours of the live session.*

What can dental professionals expect to gain during Wednesday’s free webinar?

Insight on a wide array of topics, including:

  • Human Resources,
  • Legislation,
  • Leadership During Crisis,
  • Telehealth,
  • Situational Marketing, and
  • How to properly shut down your office for an extended period of time.

Don’t wait to register.

Here is a link to sign up today for Wednesday’s free webinar.

* Note: This webinar will be recorded and shared afterward.  However, only those who attend the live webinar will receive Continuing Education credits.

Global Smile Foundation + Benco Family Foundation = access to care

In many developing countries, children with cleft lips or palates are generally ostracized from society, unable to go to school or make friends. As adults, patients with the same issues have little chance of making a living.

Fathers often leave the family, believing their child or their marriage, has been cursed; parents will abandon their infant in the hospital, unable to cope with the future the child will face.

For the past three decades, Global Smile Foundation (GSF) has been dedicated to changing those devastating consequences by making first-class cleft care accessible to all patients, regardless of geographic or socioeconomic barriers.

Who supports these positive changemakers?

Every contribution to their organization helps fund life-changing comprehensive cleft care for underserved patients. One of their longtime supporters is the Benco Family Foundation, the charitable division of Benco Dental, the nation’s largest independently owned dental distributor.

“For the past 11 years, support from the Benco Family Foundation has helped Global Smile Foundation provide comprehensive cleft care for underserved patients born with cleft lip and palate.  
The people we serve live in parts of the developing world where access to proper care is extremely limited. By helping us reach these underserved areas, Benco Family Foundation has truly helped us change the lives of our patients and their respective families.”

– Usama Hamdan, MS, FICS, Co-Founder & President of Global Smile Foundation


What a difference a year can make.

In 2019, Global Smile Foundation (GSF) conducted six missions to four countries: Peru, Ecuador, El Salvador and Lebanon. Their teams of expert medical volunteers had evaluated more than 1,000 patients by mid-November in 2019 to determine the best individual treatment plan for each patient.

Their team shared comprehensive cleft care stats for 2019 with thedailyfloss.com:

  • 358 surgical procedures for 285 patients
  • 3,786 dental procedures for 576 patients
  • 520 speech therapy procedures and sessions, including 144 feeding consultations
  • 126 Psychosocial consultations

Learn how you can support Global Smile Foundation and keep the positive changes happening: visit their website for details.

COVID-19: Connect with an expert at free 03.17 webinar

Leslie Canham CDA, RDA, shown above, has been bombarded with coronavirus questions.

To provide reliable resources and timely facts, the recognized infection control consultant and speaker is presenting a free webinar with Benco Dental. Register here.

“I’ve immersed myself in gathering facts and trusted resources to disseminate to my clients and audiences. Hopefully, we can dispel some of the myths and hysteria, and get back to the business of providing dental care to our patients.”

Leslie Canham CDA, RDA

On March 17 at 9:30 p.m. ET (6:30 p.m. PT) she’ll present a free webinar, “Coronavirus: What Dental Professionals Need To Know,” hosted by the nation’s largest independently owned dental distribution company.

Attend a free coronavirus educational webinar for dental professionals

Register here. https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2272256632991403277

Leslie Canham will present a free webinar March 17 at 9:30 p.m. ET (6:30 p.m. PT) , “Coronavirus: What Dental Professionals Need To Know,” hosted by Benco Dental.

Need to manage exposure now?

Yesterday, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued revised interim guidance on how to manage exposure to a person who has, or is suspected of having, COVID-19.

Learn more about the expert

Leslie Canham is a Certified and Registered Dental Assistant with over 48 years of experience in dentistry. Leslie sought to continue her career by exploring the continuing education needs of dental personnel. Her research led to OSHA compliance training for dental offices. Dentists, astounded by Leslie’s expertise began referring their colleagues to her. Soon her outstanding reputation spread throughout the dental community.

She is authorized by the Department of Labor as an OSHA Outreach Trainer in General Industry Standards. Leslie’s memberships include:

  • The Organization for Safety, Asepsis and Prevention
  • The Academy of Dental Management Consultants
  • The Speaking, Consulting Network
  • The American Dental Assistants Association
  • The California Dental Association
  • The California Association of Dental Assistant Teachers
  • National Speakers Association

Leslie is listed as a “leader in consulting” by Dentistry Today. She is a Certified Speaking Professional, which is a designation conferred by the National Speakers Association. Fewer than 10 percent of speakers worldwide hold this professional designation.

It is earned by a proven track record of speaking experience, expertise, a commitment to ongoing education, outstanding client service, and ethical behavior. 

Thank a dentist tomorrow on #NationalDentistDay

Working on weekends, canceling plans for our tooth emergencies and caring for us even when we ignore their expert advice to floss daily and avoid gummy bears — just a few reasons to thank a dentist tomorrow, March 6.

Who else won’t wince in the face of our nasty coffee breath or hold a grudge if we cancel plans with them at the last minute?

Maybe none of those reasons prompted the dental holiday demigods to create #NationalDentistDay, but they definitely warrant at least one positive Facebook review for your favorite practitioner.

If you’re stumped for a few other ways to show your appreciation, Chris Barnard shared seven suggestions in a blog at the Social Dental Network:

“1. Be the first of your friends to post a smile selfie on your dentist’s Facebook or Instagram page – and be sure to use the #NationalDentistsDay hashtag!

2. If you’ve been neglecting any dental treatment, schedule an appointment to get it done.

3. Show off your smile, more. Every day. Multiple times a day.

4. Be more diligent with your daily dental hygiene regimen of brushing for #2min2x a day & flossing daily.

5. If you happen to be lucky enough to actually be at your dentist’s office on National Dentist’s Day, snap a pic with them & post it on your Facebook.

6. Educate your children, family, & friends about the importance of oral health and the connection to overall health.

7. Schedule and KEEP your next dental checkup & teeth cleaning.

Social Dental Network Managing Editor Chris Barnard

Dental distributor Benco Dental celebrates all dentists with a look at dentistry, past and present. View the video below and watch for more tomorrow on Benco’s social channels:

Facebook: @BencoDental
Instagram: @BencoDental
Twitter: @BencoDental

Benco Dental Video/Allison Simenkiewicz

At the lowest point in her life Dr. Brianna ‘Crash’ Ganson finds dentistry #IE40Under40

Uncertainty does not stop Dr. Brianna Ganson; in fact, she thrives when faced with obstacles and danger. The 39-year-old adrenaline enthusiast from Missouri has survived parachuting from planes, riding out a storm that inundated a Louisiana city and swimming with sharks off the coast of Hawaii.

The most challenging part of her career: “[The] desire to own my own business.” The determination to become an entrepreneur tested the Incisal Edge 40 Under 40 honoree’s perseverance and commitment to her goals.

Dr. Brianna Ganson after her first tandem-skydive.

The first time Dr. Ganson skydived unaccompanied (not in tandem), things did not go as planned. After jumping from a plane at around 13,000 feet, she free-fell for much longer than anticipated, missing the drop zone and earning her an appropriate nickname.

“Once you pull your chute, you are all alone. I was so mesmerized by my surroundings that I wasn’t paying attention to my altimeter (altitude gauge). I was expecting a voice to come over the radio when I needed to start heading towards the drop zone. By the time I realized no one was talking to me, I was too far away from the drop zone to get there in time. I “crashed” into the trees, hence the nickname: ‘Crash.'”

Dr. Brianna Ganson on her harrowing first time, solo skydive.

Ganson landed safely. That jump and crash landing took place near her alma mater, a school where she learned the inner-workings of the human mind at the University of San Diego.

Four years after “Crash” graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology, she began her professional career as an underwriter for State Farm in Columbia, Missouri, in 2005. She planned to own a business like her father, who also worked for State Farm.

That same year, Dr. Ganson found a job over 700 miles away — a position that was accompanied by the pungent smell of Old Bay and the sounds of creole dialects. The city was New Orleans, a place where she knew no one. The Crescent City held what the doctor believed was a chance to start her own business.

“I ended up getting and accepting the position. I packed my bags in April and moved to a city I had never been to before. I continued dating the same guy long distance, and it was going well. I felt like I was on this amazing path, both professionally and personally. Then just like that, the switch flipped.”

Dr. Brianna Ganson on her long-awaited career opportunity with State Farm.

Stirring in the Gulf of Mexico was a threat to the livelihood and well-being of not only Dr. Ganson but to every person in New Orleans. One of the most deadly natural disasters in American history — Hurricane Katrina — made landfall in Southeastern Louisiana. Katrina, responsible for 1,833 fatalities, brought sustained winds and rain that pummeled the Bayou State. The hurricane blew away all sense of normalcy and left a city that resembled a dystopia.

Dr. Brianna Ganson saw devastation after Hurricane Katrina.

“My apartment was uninhabitable, so I had to stay with a couple in Baton Rouge and commute to New Orleans for work. Being in the insurance business, my job became a priority and was extremely stressful.”

Dr. Brianna Ganson, describing life after Hurricane Katrina.

After Katrina, insurance agents like Ganson were swamped with work. It did not take long for the two or sometimes three-hour commutes from Baton Rouge and tiresome workdays to grind and wash away Dr. Ganson’s happiness, leaving her in a state of perpetual stress.

She wanted a way out of post-Katrina, Louisiana, life. She found refuge where she began her career with State Farm in Columbia, MO, an agency that had the prospect of leading Ganson to entrepreneurship.

“I was so relieved to be out of New Orleans as well as to have what I thought was my dream job. My boyfriend proposed in December and I said yes. Even though Katrina totally upended my life, I felt like I was getting back on track.”

Dr. Brianna Ganson.
When driving through neighborhoods post-Katrina, Dr. Brianna Ganson saw x-codes. The left identifies the rescue squad; the top represents the date the team arrived; the right represents what hazards are inside; and the bottom lists the number of people found.

While training to become an agent, she worked in different State Farm agencies throughout Missouri. She soon discovered she was not in love with insurance. The five years she spent following the career path of her father, a trail adorned with car and home insurance policies, did not fulfill her. She wanted something else.

In October, 2006, nearly a year after Dr. Ganson was engaged, her fiancé broke off their engagement, bringing the insurance professional to the lowest point in her life. She was in a career she disliked, was separated from her longtime boyfriend and to make matters worse, the puppy she had adopted to bring her joy died due to health issues.

“It was like a country music song: ‘I went through a hurricane, got dumped by my man. Had to put my dog to sleep, got hit by a van.’ OK, the last one didn’t happen, but you get my point. I needed a serious change. As strange as it sounds, the lowest point in my life led me to dentistry. While helping others rebuild their lives in New Orleans, I was also learning the steps I would need to rebuild my own life.”

Dr. Brianna Ganson depicting her low.

Inspired by the Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Team (DMORT) that searched through desolate neighborhoods after Katrina, Dr. Ganson found a new career path, a new interest that she then did not yet understand. Using dental forensics, the team of doctors and pathologists helped identify bodies in the days and weeks after the hurricane.

Another X-Code somewhere in the devastated suburbs of New Orleans.

After a breakup and unfulfilling career, the girl from Missouri was driven by a new-found enthusiasm.

“I quit my job, moved back home, and worked for a whole year to get into dental school. In 2008, I started over on a new path, the right path, to become a dentist.”

Dr. Brianna Ganson realizing her new role.

Ganson spent four years at the University of Missouri School of Dentistry and earned her Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) in 2012. Shortly after, she accepted a position as a general dentist at Rhoades Family Dentistry.

She married Troy Ganson while in dental school. In her first year as a dentist, she experienced challenges in her personal life: she had her first child, Knox, and, unexpectedly, her father was paralyzed in a motorcycle accident.

Dr. Ganson juggled the responsibilities of caring for her newborn, helping her parents adjust to her father’s disability and maintaining her new dental role. The vision of owning her own business never left her sight.

When the first opportunity arose to buy her own business, Dr. Ganson turned-down the chance to buy an established dental practice and instead began to work for a non-profit organization called Miles of Smiles.

“This organization is a portable dental clinic that goes into schools to help children who may otherwise not receive dental care. I loved every minute of it and discovered my passion to be a pediatric dentist.”

Dr. Brianna Ganson describing how she discovered her dental specialty.

She discovered her dental niche and her devotion to help children, but the final ingredient of her career continued to elude her. The last element Dr. Ganson needed was her own practice. A colleague of hers knew just the place, but when they presented the doctor with the opportunity of business ownership, fear struck her.

Dr. Brianna Ganson cave diving off the Hawaiian coast.

She made a list of pros and cons, discussed her options with her husband and family, to no avail. Although, one conversation that she will never forget gave her the nudge she needed to follow her bliss. That advice came from her father, who inspired her entrepreneurial spirit.

When her father began his business working with State Farm, “he worked tirelessly to start his agency from scratch. He was driving home from work one night after a daunting day in the office. He was so frustrated and scared that he wouldn’t succeed,” Dr. Ganson explained. “He needed to vent, so he rolled his window down and screamed as loud as he could at these poor cows. Then he told me, ‘Brianna, if owning your own business was easy, everyone would do it.'”

That conversation with her father was the last bit of advice the doctor needed. She bought the pediatric dental practice and turned it into Happy Teeth Dentistry.

Happy Teeth Dentistry is named in memory of her father. While recovering from his accident he went to therapy three times a week. “I always wanted him to walk again, no matter how impossible that may have seemed. I decided to name the practice Happy Teeth as a spin-off of the movie ‘Happy Feet.’ I wanted him to have happy feet. I wanted him to walk,” she explained.

(Shown, from left) Dental Assistant Dominique Fisher, Office Administrator Lacee Jordan, Office Manager Ann Roehl, Dr. Brianna Ganson, Dental Assistant Lauren Harris, and Dental Assistant Jaclyn York.

Today, the woman who survived hurricane Katrina helps children maintain and restore their smiles at her office in Leawood, Kansas.

“My most favorite part of dentistry is when I get a child out of pain. A child may have been having trouble eating, talking, drinking, embarrassed to smile, and I get the opportunity to make them happy and healthy again. When a parent says they are so relieved because their child is acting like him or herself again, I have done my job. I love that.”

Dr. Brianna Ganson on the joys of dentistry.

Aside from her career, Dr. Ganson is most passionate about her family. She husband raise two children together, son, Knox, 7, and daughter, Brinkley, 5. She and her family love adrenaline activities. Dr. Ganson and her husband swam with sharks on her recent trip to Hawaii for the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry annual session.

“I have been scuba diving many times and have seen sharks before, but I wanted to get up close and personal.  I knew this would be my chance. We were in a cage and were so close to the sharks. I could have reached out and touched them. Sharks do not want to eat humans, but I didn’t want to take the chance since I need my hands to work.”

Dr. Brianna Ganson.

If you would like to learn more about Dr. Brianna Ganson and her practice, visit https://happyteethbyganson.com/.

Read more about her in Incisal Edge here: Incisal Edge

How the 1st female dentist in the U.S. Army survived the 1906 California ‘Exodus’ #womenshistorymonth

Leonie von Meusebach–Zesch survived the horrors of the 1906 San Franscisco earthquake, set up her dental practice in the Presidio Army base during the aftermath and tended refugees in the makeshift camp. She became the first (and only) female dentist in the U.S. Army until 1951.

To begin March’s celebration of #WomensHistoryMonth, Dr. Leonie von Meusebach–Zesch seems a fitting selection.

A Daughter of Aristocrats

Leonie was born in 1882 in Texas, the daughter of German aristocrats. When she was six, she moved with her mother and sister to California. They finally settled in San Francisco, where Leonie attended the local high school and in 1902 earned a degree from the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, then known as the College of Physicians and Surgeons. She became a practicing dentist in June, 1902 after passing the California State Dental Board examination. At first, she began a the practice of a Swedish immigrant dentist, but the work was long and punishing, so much so that after treating patients from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., seven days a week for some time, she collapsed from exhaustion.

Earthquake, then fire

By the time of the earthquake on April 18, 1906, Dr. Leonie von Meusebach–Zesch had opened her own dental office with a colleague. Unfortunately, on the second day of the disaster, her office succumbed to the fire that destroyed most of the city. Before the building went up in flames, she managed to get inside and save a few instruments.

“Before eight that morning, I was downtown persuading the Phelan Building agent to open the door to my offices. Water, coming through a huge hose from temporarily repaired and newly laid mains, was already breaking in the great front windows, tearing down curtains and flooding rich carpets. I had only time to get my colleague’s leather bag, pick up several dozen of his most cherished forceps and elevators, and save some instruments of my own. I could not get into the safe, so books and papers were destroyed. The roaring of the fire, the drumming of the water on walls, ceilings and furniture, and the frenzied yelling of men drove all but escape from my mind. In less than an hour after it had started burning, the whole large building was gutted.”

Leonie von Zesch, Leonie :A Women Ahead of Her Time

Afterward, the fire continued and forced Leonie and her mother from their rented rooms. They took what they could carry and started for the Presidio Army base, where many refugees were encamped.

“What I call the ‘Exodus’ fled down Van Ness Avenue to the water front, thence along the Barbary Coast and tough water front by an enormously long detour to the ferries; it was the only way, the town streets being on fire and close by the military.”

– Harry C. Carr, Complete History of the San Francisco Horror

There, her mother offered to assist the U.S. Army and Red Cross document survivors. Dr. Leonie von Meusebach–Zesch offered her skills as a dental surgeon with the Army and attended to the many now-homeless people. The Army paid and housed her and her mother. This arrangement went on until early July when the city tried to replace her in this role with a male dentist. Both the mayor, Eugene Schmitz and Brigadier General Funston, in charge of the Army, had her reinstated.

1906_SanFran_earthquake2

In total, 30,000 refugees were cared for by the government at the Presidio base.

“It should be called the ‘Exodus,’ for it was a Biblical scene. It was the headlong flight of those who were most terror-stricken to get out of the doomed city.”

Harry C. Carr, Complete History of the San Francisco Horror

Starting Again

By 1907, Dr. Leonie von Meusebach–Zesch tried to start a private dental practice of her own. She did not receive many new clients, but she had additional income from appointments as dentist to the Children’s Hospital and to the Maria Kipp Orphanage. In 1908, she received agreements from commanders of both the United States Pacific Fleet and the United States Atlantic Fleet to bring dentists and lab technicians aboard ships and provide dental services to members of the crews. While this kept her busy, it was not particularly profitable.

On the Move

By 1908, she was on the move again, this time moving back to Texas with her mother. She became licensed in the state and afterward declined one offer from a Dallas businessman to front a statewide chain of dental offices that he intended to manage in the background.

After working for several years in Texas, she moved to Arizona, becoming licensed in that state. She started a business as a traveling dentist, driving around in her Model T, treating school children for free; she also treated many from the indigenous Indian tribes in the area. After being in practice there for a few years, she left for on a visit to her sister and brother-in-law in the territory of Alaska.

Time for New Adventures

She eventually moved her practice to Alaska and served several communities there for a number of years, practicing in remote Inuit villages and even a near-death experience.

More to the Story

There is much more to the amazing Leonie von Zesch’s story. She had many more adventures before dying at the age of 61 in 1944. Information can be found on her Wikipedia page here. Also, you can purchase her autobiography here on Amazon.

She was elected posthumously to the Alaskan Women’s Hall of Fame in 2012.

Celebrate women in dentistry with The Lucy Hobbs Project

Every day Benco Dental salutes women in dentistry, both past and present. The nation’s largest independently owned dental distributor created The Lucy Hobbs Project to promote all women in the profession.

For more information on The Lucy Hobbs Project, click here.

About the blogger

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

Where is healthcare design headed in 2020? #HCDcon #mondaymotivation

Each year, thousands of design pros unite to discuss the latest research, trends, and strategies with peers and experts at the Healthcare Design Expo & Conference.

Our CenterPoint Design team at Benco Dental attends annually and gains inspiration and new ideas for current and future dental practice projects.
At the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana in November, I was able to participate at #HCDcon and today I’ll share a few ideas to provide #MondayMotivation for dental practices.

2 incredible dental office design ideas from HCDcon

  • Consider pastel and jewel tones. Pastel tones were featured at almost every booth that I visited. Light blue, sage green, lilac, and blush were the most common. A combination of the rich jewel tones with the light pastels (shown at top) created a great contrast and balance within the collections. Jewel tones most commonly featured were eggplant, emerald, and navy green.
Pastel tones (shown) took center stage at the Healthcare Design Expo in New Orleans. Shown are some vinyl options from Architex.
Patcraft flooring, Mark Making, shown, was created by a designer known for her watercolors. She used repetitive stokes to create this pattern.
  • Plan for future modifications with your current choices. Dental practices and hospitals can take months — or years –to build, and by that time new products and equipment needs to be incorporated into the space. Herman Miller (below), Kimball Health, and Steelcase Health all showed this trend with products to fit the new innovations that doctors and facilities are looking to incorporate. How do you prepare for continued innovation within the healthcare industry? Consider innovative practice designs.
    Herman Miller bonus: This Benco Dental vendor offers the ability to pattern match in two ways. They insure a pattered fabric is exactly lined up on the seams and can also pattern match so that the fabric is at the exact same place from chair to chair.
Herman Miller offers modifiable products to accommodate the innovations that doctors are looking to incorporate at their practices.
Herman Miller, above, offers the ability to pattern match in two ways. They insure a pattered fabric is exactly lined up on the seams and can also pattern match so that the fabric is at the exact same place from chair to chair.
Let’s talk textiles. Architex showed beautiful vinyl options (shown, above).

What other people are doing in the dental profession?

  • Focusing on the user experience. Incorporating similarities across multiple offices such as using the same equipment, colors, and scheme will make the patient feel comfortable. Including signature elements that repeat, such as check-in stations.
  • Addressing the generational divide. Create a space that attracts multiple generations at one practice.

Ready for more #MondayMotivation?

View more from the conference here.
Watch for an update after the next Expo, which will take place November 7-10, 2020 in Nashville, TN.

Me taking in the New Orleans scene at Healthcare Design Expo & Conference #HCDcon

Butterfly? Magical mentor? Benco Tooth Fairy illuminates preschoolers #NationalToothFairyDay

As the Benco Tooth Fairy took flight after a visit with the Illumination Early Learning Center in Kingston, Pennsylvania, Macklan, one pre-school student asked, “Where did that butterfly go?”

Pat Motyka, a 10-year associate at the nation’s largest independently owned dental distributor, delivers smiles to youngsters throughout the year, but there’s no better time to share a tale of her recent adventures than today — #National Tooth Fairy Day.

Unless it’s during a visit to the dentist, people rarely volunteer details on their toothbrush and floss habits. Not the case with this pre-school class. Sixteen students were more than willing to express their enthusiasm for dental hygiene, as well as a love and admiration for the Benco Dental Tooth Fairy.

Resplendent in white attire and a glittering crown and wings, Pat Motyka, a Tooth Customer Service Specialist at the dental distributor’s home office in Pittston, entered the preschool classroom for a visit last fall.

“Visitors absolutely help the classroom. I think sometimes when the message is conveyed by another person (not the teacher or parent) they truly take it to heart. “

Elizabeth Muller, a teacher at Illumination Early Learning Center

Students intently listened and watched as the Tooth Fairy spoke on the importance of brushing and flossing, and handed out cartoon coloring sheets with a little magical help from Benco Associate Debby Wargo. Her audience jumped to the task when she offered a hands-on experience brushing the teeth of Finn, a plush shark puppet used for dental hygiene demos (shown at top).

Students coloring at Illumination Early Learning Center

Teacher Amy Wall reminisced about her childhood experience with a loose tooth.

“When I was little, I didn’t want to eat an apple because my tooth was loose and wiggly. So I would only eat mashed potatoes and jelly. One day at school I forgot and ate the apple. My tooth was stuck in it and I didn’t even realize it came out. I was a little bit petrified.”

Amy Wall a teacher at Illumination Learning Center

Students rushed to impress Tooth Fairy Pat with their brush and floss routines. An excited young boy raised his hand to explain that his Mommy always tells him to floss his teeth.

Wall said even before the Tooth Fairy arrived, students were excited and trying to guess what she would wear, some asking: “Do you think she’ll have wings?”

Before the Tooth Fairy made her exit for the journey back to Benco, she gifted each child with a take-home package, including a dental kit, stickers and other surprises.

Though new to the Tooth Fairy role, with just a few classroom visits under her wings, Motyka brings 10 years of dental industry experience to her position at Benco Dental.

Benco Tooth Fairy Pat Motyka with students at Illumination Early Learning Center in Kingston, Pennsylvania.

Along with being seen as a role model for many of the children and adding some sparkle to their day, she feels her visits always make an impact.

“A lot of parents don’t tell their kids about dental health — I know mine didn’t. I think it’s important, because that’s the first thing you see when you talk to someone: their teeth. Benco was kind enough to donate tooth gel, toothbrushes, and brushing charts for the dental kit, which will help them.”

Benco Tooth Fairy Pat Motyka

For details or more information, visit benco.com or call 1.800.GO.BENCO.