Have We Become Sweeter Over Time?

sugar_graphThink about this statistic: in 1900, Americans consumed 90 pounds of sugar per year. By 2008, that number had doubled to 180 pounds per year. The US ranks as having the highest average daily sugar consumption per person. What has happened to our eating habits since 1900?

Hop in the Wayback Machine

Did they just not have accessibility to sugar in the old days? No, sugar has always been around, mostly in the form of honey or maple syrup. Ancient peoples in countries in the Middle East also learned to develop it from cane stalks. This process eventually worked its way to the West Indies. By the 18th century, the majority of sugar for export was produced in the Caribbean, to be sent to American and England.

But Didn’t We Make Sugar Here?

Didn’t we have sugar plantations here? Sure, but due to the relatively short growing season in the American south, US sugar consumption has always relied on substantial imports. In the decade preceding the Civil War, sugar cane producers in the South supplied only about 1/3 of America’s consumption and the cost of sugar fluctuated periodically. Producing sugar was a labor-intensive operation.

Victorian-Era-Candy-Making-1More Sugar, Please!

Still, with the majority of sugar production coming from the West Indies, and with cheap labor and improvements in mechanization, the cost of sugar over time during the 19th century became more affordable. This was reflected in the change in American diets by the middle of the 19th century. Americans began eating more jams, candy, cocoa, and other sweetened foods.

confectioneryKids Will Be Kids

People in the 19th century are not that far removed from us, in their likes and dislikes. In 1857, The Ohio Journal of Education, Volume 6, described an “Object Lesson” where the children were invited to list “things to be seen”. The results were listed by the teacher on the blackboard. Among the items listed were different types of foods, like meats, pies, and of course, candy. They were children, after all. This gives us a convenient list of candy that children of the mid-19th century liked. And there were many. Among them:

Pop-corn, peppermint, cream, molasses, rose, nut, clove, butterscotch, sugar plums, lemon drops, French kisses, cinnamon, wintergreen, sour drops, hoarhound, gum drops, lavender…

More candy…

As the century wore on, mechanization of candy production and sugar-making improved and sugar became cheaper and more readily available. This meant more candy and sweet stuff available and being consumed by the public. Sugar and candy were presented as pure and good for you.

Is this healthy?

By the 1970s, high fructose corn syrup was introduced into the US food industry and soon became prevalent in many foods, even those that don’t seem to require sweetener, like salad dressings and frozen pizza. High fructose corn syrup is cheap to produce and mimics sugar in its taste and function. Consumption of fructose has climbed steadily since the 1970s, from 37 grams per day to 62.5 grams per day in the early 2000s. This is the start of the “hidden sugar” in American processed food. But is all this sugar entirely healthy? The messaging the American public has been getting regarding our diet since the 1970s has been that fat is bad and sugar is, if not exactly good for us, certainly not bad for us. But is that entirely true…

Enter a Dental Crusader

It seems the Sugar Research Foundation, the sugar lobby that is extremely active in Washington politics, working on behalf of the sugar industry, “has worked to influence the types of research questions that our federal agencies pursue, withheld important knowledge about how our bodies metabolize sugar and skewed research to exonerate their product.” This from Dr. Cristin Kearns in the summer, 2019 Incisal Edge magazine. Dr. Kearns sees herself as a dentist-turned-journalist/crusader. She is featured in the summer issue of Incisal Edge magazine, produced by Benco Dental, where she explains that she was a dentist and director of a public health clinic in Denver. She is now at USCF, working to uncover the truth about how harmful sugar can be for our teeth and our diet.

OldDesignShop_AtmoresMincemeatAdCard2

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

It’s Thursday and Benco’s got #6NeatThings you should know about

The nation’s largest family-owned dental distributor strives to make it simple to stay up to date with the latest equipment and technology. 

Benco Dental is #drivingdentistryforward with the newest and coolest technology doctors need in the form of its #SixNeatThings promotion.

Minimize waste and optimize price-effectiveness with Ivoclar Vivadent’s Adhese Universal.

Click and Bond! Universal adhesion arrives in an advanced delivery form.

Adhese Universal is a single-component, light-cured universal adhesive for direct and indirect bonding procedures that features compatibility with all etching techniques.

The Adhese Universal from Ivoclar Vivadent.

Adhese Universal is beneficial because it has high-bond strength and virtually no sensitivity. It’s also available in a traditional bottle, as well as a unique VivaPen delivery. 

The VivaPen offers advantages such as: 

  • Fast and convenient direct intra-oral application 
  • Lowest cost per application
    • Offers 190 single-tooth applicators 
  • 67% less material waste, compared to a conventional bottle 

Those interested in the Adhese Universal can read more about it here.

Dress your whole office staff in style with garments from Benco Brands 

Benco offers a variety of different garments to suit every need of your office: 

  • Benco Dental Premium Lab Coats 
  • Benco Dental Lab Coats 
  • ValuLine Lab Jackets 
  • Benco Dental Premium Isolation Gowns 
  • Benco Dental Isolation Gowns 
  • ValuLine Isolation Gowns 

Maxmize your comfort and keep your staff and your patients safe from cross-contamination with any of the garments offered by Benco Dental.

Click here to read more information on the garments. 

Get excellent material quality and outstanding processing characteristics for fast milling and polishing with the VITA SUPRINITY PC zirconia-reinforced block. 

The VITA SUPRINITY PC offers several benefits:

  • Partially crystalized 
  • Offers a fine grain 
  • Has high-accuracy share reproduction 
  • Has the strength of 541 MPa
VITA SUPRINITY PC 3 block options: A1-T, A2-T, A3-T.

The VITA SUPRINITY PC is even designed for minimal wall thickness which means it can be milled with very thin edges all while preventing any chipping.

When dealing with things like posterior and anterior crowns or veneers, don’t settle for anything less than the VITA SUPRINITY PC.

Learn more about the VITA SUPRINITY PC by clicking here

Never deal with accidental spillage again with Vista Dental Products’ Dripless Syringe 

When doing Endo irrigation procedures, protect you and your patients from the risk of bleach stains, damage to skin, eyes and oral mucosa. Costs no more than a standard syringe.

The pre-tipped syringes increase efficiency and lower costs from waste. 

The Dripless Syringe offered by Vista Dental Products.

The Dripless Syringe comes with several benefits: 

  • Reduced risk of bleach stains 
  • Reduced risk of skin irritation 
  • Reduced risk of damage to the eyes and oral mucosa 

The Dripless Syringe comes with 27ga side-vented needles that are tipped with the Appli-Vac Irrigating Tips, all while costing no more than a standard irrigating syringe. 

To learn more about Vista Dental Products’ Dripless Syringe, click here

Help your patients keep periodontal disease at bay with the Perio Restore™ Oral Cleansing Gel.

Fight bacteria in the pocket. Control and reverse early-to-late stages of periodontal disease. Perio Restore provides significant reduction of bacteria

The cleansing gel is a 1.7% hydrogen peroxide formula with mint flavor that helps reduces the effects of the disease when used in conjunction with personalized perio treatment trays between each dental visit. 

The Perio Restore™ Oral Cleansing Gel by DenMat.

The Perio Restore™ Oral Cleansing Gel can be used by a variety of patients: 

  • Those who have inconsistent homecare routines 
  • Those suffering from any stage of gum disease 
  • Those with extensive rotations like crowns, bridges or bonding 
  • Those who are high-risk during advanced medical treatments 

Click here to learn more about the Perio Restore™ Oral Cleansing Gel

The KaVo PROPHYflexTM 4 air polisher makes daily prophylaxis treatments easier, quicker and more thorough.

The KaVo PROPHYflexTM offers a seemless design that allows for disassembly, cleansing, disinfection, and the sterilization of the device to ensure the best possible infection control for patients. 

The KaVo PROPHYflexTM 4 is offered in a variety of colors.

The KaVo PROPHYflexTM 4 also offers several key benefits: 

  • Highly precise powder jet offers less powder mist
  • Narrow canal shape offers improved visibility during supragingival cleaning 
  • 360° rotation grip sleeve offers access to hard-to-reach spots 
  • Adjustable lengths for the handpiece offer the perfect fit for you 

Learn more about the KaVo PROPHYflexTM here

Benco remembers dedication and talent of longtime associates

In 1930 when Ben Cohen set out to establish a business in Pennsylvania, he traveled by train, delivering supplies his dental customers needed to improve the health of their patients. He realized that continued growth of his solo venture depended on enlisting the talents and dedication of others and he selected those trusted few with care.

Joanne Minichowski, wife of the late Tony Minichowski, and Ned Sarf, brother-in-law of Joanne, visit Benco Dental for a September 26 Remembrance Day.

Tony Minichowski, who started at Benco in 1941, was one of them. 

Last week at a Remembrance Day ceremony at Benco’s home office, Larry Cohen, who built the company alongside his father Ben, paid tribute to Tony, and to four other longtime associates who have died.

“Tony began his career making deliveries, working his way up to Branch Manager and later Vice President and General Manager. He was my right- hand man and probably one of the main reasons we survived those tumultuous early years.”

Larry Cohen, Benco Chairman and Chief Customer Advocate

As a young boy on summer breaks from school, Larry visited customers on the road by Ben’s side and learned firsthand the importance of relationships. Larry also worked at the first Benco office, alongside those associates, Tony among them. They delivered a unique customer experience. They established trust — and in many cases lifelong friendships. This was the birth of the Benco Difference.

Last week at a Remembrance Day ceremony at Benco’s home office, Larry Cohen, who built the company alongside his father Ben Cohen, paid tribute to Tony, and to four other longtime associates who have died.

“Tony loved his colleagues and truly enjoyed going to work every day, which was apparent as he did not retire until he was 80,” said Larry, recalling Tony’s 64 years with the company.

Sandy Thiel, Sally Cohen, Larry Cohen and Joanne Minichowski at a September 26 Remembrance Day hosted at Benco Dental. Among associate honored were the late Jim Thiel and Tony Minichowski, who dedicated a combined 94 years to the company.

“I have often said Tony was the best thing my father, Ben, left me and that comment is true today. I am not sure Benco would be where we are today without Tony. He was the key ingredient in Benco’s history and growth; he will be remembered with affection and appreciation.”

Larry Cohen, speaking about 64-year Benco associate Tony Minichowski

A 15-minute conversation led to 32 years of technical mastery

“I hired Jim Thiel within 15 minutes of meeting him and never regretted it,” said Larry, of the late master technician who dedicated 32 years to Benco Dental. 

The late Jim Thiel dedicated 32 years to Benco Dental.

Larry shared the story of the day he interviewed Thiel for a position at Benco and the years that followed.

“A dental assistant for one of our Scranton customers kept telling us we should hire her husband, who was working as a muffler installer. That was Jim. At that time we were expanding into Philly and soon after his training he moved there to become our first technician in that market. He became so popular that we won customers because of his mechanical and technical skills.”

The late Steve Zang joined the Benco family in August, 1987 as a Friendly Benco Rep and shared 30 years of dental industry knowledge in the company’s Ohio Valley region. Steve honorably served in the U.S. Army and Reserves for 27 years, including tours in Vietnam and Desert Storm.

Eric Cooney, Regional Manager describes Steve as “very proud of his family, military service and being part of the Benco Dental sales force…. All of Ohio Valley misses Steve’s quirky sense of humor and warm heart.”

In 2005, Bill Macintosh joined the Benco family as an Equipment Support Technician in the Blue Ridge region. Chuck Puckett, Blue Ridge Equipment Support Manager in the region shared his team’s sentiments about his late colleague:

“Bill was a good friend, an excellent technician and a teammate who you could count on. Always willing to lend a hand, he was also there with a kind word to pick you up when you needed it. He will be missed.”

The late Andrew Fant was a member of the Benco family for more than 10 years. 

“Andrew was a loving stepfather, a musically-gifted pianist and talented woodworker. He was a thoughtful man who always looked out for his team,” said Carolinas region Equipment Support Manager Mike Whitlock.

‘Fall’ing in love with new dental innovations

This cycle of 6 Neat Things in order are, Ivoclar’s Cervitec Plus Varnish, Dental and Surgical Bibs from GantGuard™, the Clorox Versa Sure Wipes, the SciCan G4 Statclave, the Benco Brands VPS Connector and Ribbon Holder and the VOCO Admira Fusion x-tra.

The nation’s largest family-owned dental distributor strives to make it simple to stay up to date with the latest equipment and technology. 

Benco Dental is driving dentistry forward with the newest and coolest technology doctors need in the form of its Six Neat Things promotion.

Protect at-risk, exposed and sensitive tooth surfaces with the Cervitec Plus Varnish from Ivoclar

The proven combination of 1% chlorhexidine and 1% thymol firmly adheres to tooth surfaces, creating a shield of long-lasting protection. 

The Cervitec Plus Varnish from Ivoclar.

The Cervitec Plus Varnish can be used for things such as:

  • Exposed cervical margins 
  • Crowns and bridges 
  • Implants 
  • Orthodontic brackets 
  • Proximal areas 
  • Fissures 
  • Restorations 

Ivoclar’s Cervitec Plus Varnish even offers a transparent varnish. 

For more information on Ivoclar’s Cervitec Plus Varnish, click here.

Keep your patients’ clothing protected with the GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs.

These bibs remove the cold, uncomfortable alligator bibs used in the past. The GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs also free up storage by removing the clutter of chains. 

The GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs.

The GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs offer several key benefits: 

  • Keeps clothing clean and dry
  • Avoids stains
  • Self-adhesive 
  • Ability to be repositioned 
  • No cross-contamination 

Click here for more information on the GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs.

Keep all of your office surfaces clean with the Clorox Versa Sure Wipes

These disinfectant wipes are alcohol-free, have low odor and low residue. 

The Clorox Versa Wipes kill bacteria and fungus like MRSA and TB in as little as two minutes. They can also kill viruses like mumps and measles in as little as 30 seconds.

The Clorox VersaSure Wipes.

The wipes can be used on surfaces commonly found in healthcare settings such as: 

  • Common plastics 
  • Stainless steel 
  • Glass 
  • High-end finishes like Corian™ and marble 

For more information about the Clorox Versa Sure Wipes click here.

Sterilize all of your dental equipment with the SciCan G4 Statclave

The sleek design can get equipment from dirty to sterile in as quick as 38 seconds.

The SciCan G4 Statclave connects to smart devices to provide all vital notifications right at your fingertips.

The SciCan G4 Statclave.

The sterilizer offers several features to ensure the cleanliness of your equipment:

  • Fast 
  • Closed-door drying
  • 11-inch chamber capacity 
  • Gentle sterilization 
  • Versatile amount of filling and draining options

Click here to read more about the SciCan G4 Statclave.

Never waste impression material again with the Benco Brands VPS Connector and Ribbon Holder

With the ability to transfer leftover impression material from one cartridge to another.

The VSP Connector and Ribbon Holder from Benco Dental.

The reusable ribbon holders enable a strong connection between cartridges.

Learn more about the Benco Brands VPS Transfer Connector and Ribbon Holder here.

Cure with simplicity and the VOCO Admira Fusion x-tra 

The Admira Fusion x-tra’s omni-chromatic shade means there’s no more guesswork and no more wasted shades.

The Admira Fusion x-tra from VOCO.

The Admira Fusion x-tra offers several key benefits: 

  • Extra low shrinkage 
  • Extra depth of cure 
  • Extra high biocompatibility 

The easy to polish, highly stain resistant restorative offers a high gloss finish.

Click here for more information about the VOCO Admira Fusion x-tra.

For details on any of these products, call 1.800.GOBENCO

MOM Pittsburgh: An oral health three-peat

This year, as of 3 a.m. on Friday, July 26, over 250 people were already lined up outside PPG Paints Arena – the city’s downtown hockey arena. A few hours later at 6 a.m., the 2019 Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh Free Dental Clinic opened its doors to the community.

In the two days that followed, 1,302 patients received hope and healing at the hands of 1,469 care providers. The clinic provides services at no charge to adults and children age 2 and up; there are no income or eligibility requirements. Patients – many from working families – attend because they lack dental insurance or access to dental care.

Photos courtesy TeleTracking

A solution born out of need

The idea for establishing an annual dental care event in Pittsburgh was born out of conversations between Dr. Daniel Pituch; Dr. Richard M. Celko; and Michael Zamagias, chairman and chief executive officer of the Pittsburgh-based healthcare technology company TeleTracking, Inc., who together saw the need in the community to provide this service on an annual basis.

In 2017 it came to fruition in the form of Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh, a free, two-day dental clinic, presented by A Call to Care, a Pittsburgh-based nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

Photos courtesy TeleTracking

‘No patient is turned away due to lack of capacity’

What keeps it rolling? The entire event is run and staffed by volunteers.

  • 176 Dentists (9 Endodontists, 7 Non-clinical, 11 Pediatric Dentists, 4 Prosthodontists, 4 Radiologists, 73 Restorative, 5 Routing, 46 Surgery, 17 Triage)
  • 90 Hygienists
  • 164 TeleTracking employees

Hear them in action in an NPR report by WESA’s Katie Blackley: https://www.npr.org/2019/08/01/747190755/1-300-wait-for-free-dental-care-in-pittsburgh?fbclid=IwAR21gRHACVlx8Qx3r41sJ_skLDvaJBenFg9qAT5dHyIjJT4f4WWpNy8IM9c

The costs of presenting (PPG Paints Arena rental, materials, dental equipment, supplies, and more) are made possible by the generosity of dedicated partners, sponsors and funders, according to Kayleigh Fontana, Marketing Campaign Manager for TeleTracking.

Dr. Gordon Christiansen, Founder and CEO of Practical Clinical Courses, with Benco Dental’s Jim Stoyanoff, who attended the July event in support. Benco invited two Equipment Support Technicians to donate their time and labor for the entirety of the two-day event. Also the dental distributor donated $5,000 in merchandise discounts and more than 300 volunteer hours by Benco associates.

“The clinic has grown each year, increasing the number of dental chairs (from 50 chairs in 2017 to 100 chairs in 2019) and volunteers each year to meet the need. No patient is turned away due to lack of capacity.”

Kayleigh Fontana, Marketing Campaign Manager for TeleTracking.
One of the Mission Leaders Dr. Daniel Pituch, with a patient at the 2019 event.

How does it make a difference?

By establishing this clinic as an annual event, Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh makes it possible for individuals with limited access to dental care to see a dental professional at least once a year.

Services provided include:
* full dental exam,
* X-rays,
* cleanings,
* minor restorative fillings,
* extractions,
* root canal treatments on select teeth,
* oral hygiene instruction, and
* temporary partial dental appliances

Data gathered from a survey of Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh patients in 2018 revealed that 45 percent of patients who attended the clinic had experienced dental pain for more than a year, and 25 percent reported visiting the emergency department for dental pain.

Research shows that poor oral health has a significant impact on overall health, including premature birth and an increased risk of cancer. The bacteria present in oral infections has been found to contribute to the risk for heart disease and stroke. Studies have found that having damaged, broken or missing teeth impacts an individual’s sense of confidence, well-being, and employability, as well as earning power.

Photos courtesy TeleTracking

Want to participate in 2020?

For news on the 2020 Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh dental clinic, and opportunities to volunteer next year, follow Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/MOMPGH/ and Twitter @MOM_PGH.

Want to donate or volunteer? Visit: https://mompgh.org/donate/

The Lucy Hobbs Way

While we generally profile great women from dentistry’s past, we do not want to neglect any woman of the past who has advanced the cause of equality for women and the advancement of society in general. On the run-up to the 100th anniversary of American women getting the vote (women were enfranchised via the 19th amendment on August 26, 1920) we are profiling a woman who worked tirelessly for others in the medical field as a nurse and also championed women’s right to vote – Mary Bartlett Dixon Cullen. She displayed the tenacity and persistence, along with the will to make things better, that we at Benco Dental and the entire Lucy Hobbs Project hope to support in today’s women dentists.

Mary-Bartlett_Dixon_Photo - Newspapers.com
Photo from The Baltimore Evening Sun, August 14, 1912.

Mary was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1873. Her father, William T. Dixon, was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University Hospital before becoming President of the hospital; he also owned the Dixon-Bartlett Company and was president of the National Exchange Bank. Mary Bartlett Dixon was admitted to the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, as many other young women were starting to do, as the Civil War had opened that career up for females.

At the time of her enrollment, the student nurses worked longer hours than the Principal of the School of Nursing, Adelaide Nutting, thought they should. She figured with the President of the university’s daughter enrolled, he would see and hopefully, reduce, the number of hours the nurses toiled. This strategy worked, and Mr. Dixon reduced the hours, however; Miss Dixon worked twice as hard as her peers and graduated in 1903.

No Longer Neutral

As she started working, Mary chafed at the neutral stance nurses were expected to exhibit in the face of political inequality. At one point, she wrote a letter to the editor of the American Journal of Nurses criticizing the journal’s neutral position on women’s suffrage. She rapidly realized that one could not separate women’s health with women’s rights – they were undeniably linked. How could you improve people’s health if you couldn’t improve their lot politically? In October 1908, Dixon published an essay titled “Votes for Women” in the Nurses’ Journal of the Pacific Coast. Dixon asserted, “no other issue or matter could be attended to until nurses were politically oriented.” She urged nurses to find out the voting laws in each state, as some states (particularly in the West) allowed women to vote in local elections, although by the early 1900s, if a state had allowed women to vote in certain elections, they might have revoked such rights and no woman could vote in a national election. Most states had some combination of rules that allowed almost any one, (sometimes they needed to own property) over the age of 21 and who lived in a community for one year to be eligible to vote ‘except women, children, idiots, and criminals,” Mary found.

Pushing Ahead

By October 1909, Mary was the chairman of the Woman’s Suffrage Association of Maryland, compiling a pamphlet championing the cause of women to vote. Along with working tirelessly for suffrage, she continued her nursing. She worried that there was no nursing school or hospital in Easton, the seat of Talbot County, Maryland.  In 1907, she and Elizabeth Wright set up a school of nursing with no money – it was all staffed by volunteers. The school eventually became the MacQueen Gibbs Willis School of Nursing and then part of the Allied Health program at Chesapeake College. She was also the founder of the Talbot County Children’s Aid Society.

Not Afraid to Suffer for the Cause

Mary_Bartlett_Dixon_groupphoto
Caption: “Some of the picket line of Nov. 10, 1917.” Left to right: Mrs. Catherine Martinette, Eagle Grove, Iowa. Mrs. William Kent, Kentfield, California. Miss Mary Bartlett Dixon, Easton, Md. Mrs. C.T. Robertson, Salt Lake City, Utah. Miss Cora Week, New York City. Miss Amy Ju[e]ngling, Buffalo, N.Y. Miss Hattie Kruger, Buffalo, N.Y. Miss Belle Sheinberg, N.Y.C. Miss Julia Emory, Baltimore, Md.

Credit: Photograph by Harris & Ewing, Washington, D.C., November 10, 1917. Cropped version of the photograph published in The Suffragist 5, no. 95 (Nov. 17, 1917). Available from the Library of Congress, National Woman’s Party Records, Group II, Container II:276, Folder: Group Photographs Nos. 77-87, and online at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/mnwp.276023.

A few years later the issue of women’s suffrage was facing several important votes. A portion of the suffrage movement known as the National Woman’s Party led by suffragist Alice Paul became the first “cause” to picket outside the White House. The ladies marched with signs and held mostly peaceful protests. In March 1913, Woodrow Wilson received the first suffragists in the White House—led by Alice Paul, and including Mary Bartlett Dixon and three others. Because state level suffrage was met with great resistance, suffragists like Dixon knew that a constitutional amendment was the only way to gain equality everywhere. On November 10, 1917, Dixon posed with a group of women protestors for a photograph including the suffrage banner and a critique of President Wilson. That day, Dixon was arrested for picketing the White House. She was sent to the Occoquan Workhouse along with many other suffragists.

Unstoppable

Mary_Bartlett_Dixon_float - Newspapers.com
Image of Mary Bartlett Dixon on a float in front of the Talbot County Courthouse, circa 1911-1912. The Easton Star Democrat, April 5, 2018.

This stint in the workhouse apparently did not stop Mary from continuing her quest for universal suffrage. She went back to Maryland and continued the fight.

Gaining the Vote

Mary Bartlett Dixon was married shortly before she gained the right to vote. She married Dr. Thomas S. Cullen, a gynecologist at Johns Hopkins, in a small ceremony surrounded by family on April 6, 1920.

Last Accolades

In 1949 the Board of the Memorial Hospital of Easton decided to name establish a new fund in Mary’s name, the Mary Bartlett Dixon Cullen fund for Nursing Education.

After her husband died in 1953, she donated her Baltimore home to the American Cancer Society.

A Quaker, she was a member of the Friends Meeting in Easton, Maryland. Mary Bartlett Dixon Cullen died on September 6, 1957, at her home, Moreling Chance, near Easton. She was buried in Spring Hill Cemetery, in Easton, Talbot County, Maryland.

For more information on the unsung life of Mary Bartlett Dixon, see this biographical sketch here.

For more information on the Benco Dental Lucy Hobbs Project, supporting women in dentistry, click here.

IMG_7400
Some modern-day suffragettes, displaying their colors at a vintage event.

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

3 steps to get started designing your dental practice

Dentist and architect Dr. Tristan Hamilton will guide attendees at a Build Your Future event Sept. 19 and 20. America’s leading design workshops – specifically created for dentists— offer insight on interior design, architecture, financing your project and readying your team for the transformation.

Register today for the two- day September event that will be hosted at Benco Dental’s CenterPoint East in Pittston, Pennsylvania. Call 1.800.GOBENCO or see your Friendly Benco Dental Rep for details. More: https://www.facebook.com/events/2229545497362002/?ti=icl

In a recent interview, Dr. Hamilton shared three steps to get started on designing your dental practice. His guidance helps turn what might seem like a daunting concept into an exciting, rewarding experience.

1. Select the right team

Just like picking the right employees for a dental practice team is so important, picking the right team for designing a practice is vital, too, said Dr. Hamilton. Contact a dental Equipment Specialist, all of the other aspects of your timeline will fall into place.

Staying in contact with a dental Equipment Specialist is especially important because she or he can offer insight on topics like which contractors deliver projects on time, and on budget and created amazing outcomes. The same goes when selecting to select the right architect and interior designer.

As soon as all of your team members are in place, the process will flow smoothly.

2. Create a mission portfolio

Also known as vision boards, mission portfolios allow doctors to view their goals and inspirations. These portfolios act as a check and balance system between the doctor’s wants and the project itself.

Since there are so many working parts todesigning an office, it’s important to keep track of all of them.

The mission portfolios offer a platform to answer questions such as:

  • How many operatories will the practice have?
  • Do you want an existing space, or would you prefer to build one?
  • How much external car traffic do you seek outside of your practice?
    • Are you aiming for pedestrian traffic?

Sites like Houzz.com or Pinterest allow doctors to set up all of their favorite inspirations in one list. Having this list leads to better communication with the interior designers, which ultimately results in an amazing animation of the client’s needs and the designer’s ideas.

3. Attend a Build Your Future workshop

As much as dental school prepares doctors for the day-to-day challenges they may face at a dental practice, a Build Your Future workshop explains all of the intricate parts involved with designing a practice.

These workshops offer the information to create the perfect space for both a practice and patients.

The Build Your Future Workshops address designing an office from start to finish, so doctors are fully prepared take the project head on.

Advice, information and guidance will prevent any pitfalls when actually in the process of designing a practice that will support the rest of a successful dental career.

Those interested in viewing a schedule for Dr. Hamilton’s Build Your Future workshops can do so here.

Dr. Tristan Hamilton presents at a Build Your Future event hosted in June.

What can you expect?

Earn up to 8.5 CE credits at dentistry’s leading design workshop featuring keynote speaker Tristan Hamilton, DDS, M. Arch.

Also featuring:

  • “Financing- Putting it All Together” with Charles Loretto, Partner, Cain Watters & Associates President, National Dental Placements
  • “Practice Management Coaching” with Kay Huff, Benco Dental Director of Dental Coaching.
  • “The Power of Interior Design” with Melissa Sprau, NCIDQ, Benco Dental, Manager, CenterPoint Design

Details:
Accomplish the following objectives —
• Walk away with a foundation of how a properly designed office can increase production and efficiency.

• Learn what constitutes an effective floor plan.

• Know how to get the right people on your team to help you achieve the low stress office design you need to succeed.

• Discover what makes a patient more anxious in your office and how you can alleviate it.

Creating anaward-winning office isn’t as hard as it seems

Again, it all comes down to the team. Once all of the positions are filled, from Equipment Specialist to Interior Designer, the foundation for an award-winning office will be built.

Just like your team is important for the initial creation ofyour space, it’s important for any redesigning you may choose to do, too.

Having the right team in place is vital to achieving things like compassionate aesthetic, circulation, patient experience and dental team efficiency.

“In order to keep the humanity of dentistry in place, all of these goals much be achieved. Dentists must be able to view their practice through a compassionate lens to create a space where their patients are comfortable.”

Dr. Tristan Hamilton

Everything from the colors on the walls down to your choice of furnishing can help create a practice that destroys dental phobias and hence becomes an award-winning practice.

With the right team, all of these goals can be so easily reached.

Read More »

Practically Painless Dentistry?

A group of dentists working together in a central location and offering all sorts of dental procedures, painlessly – that’s a modern invention, right? Wrong! Back at the turn of the last century, there were several dental groups that advertised “Painless Dentistry”.

False Advertising

Painless_dentist_SpokaneChronicleWash_oct21_1904 - Newspapers.co

How painless were they? It’s hard to determine that now, but several made that claim. The first outfit I came across that advertised “…teeth extracted, filled or crowned without pain…” was the Boston Painless Dentists (shown at left), advertising, not in Boston, but way out in Seattle, Portland, and Tacoma in 1904. My first thought was that they were probably using cocaine, or some other now-banned drug to help with the pain. They did not reveal their pain-relief methods.

Then there was the Chicago Painless Dentists (shown below), again, not practicing in Chicago, but in Portland, Oregon. They claimed to extract teeth, “…WITHOUT PAIN. Nothing inhaled – no gas, no chloroform or ether – and above all, no cocaine…” That sounds good, doesn’t it? Possibly better than the Boston Painless Dentists.

A Fairy Tale You Say?

Moving East toward the middle of the United States, we run into the New York Painless Dentists (shown below). Why are all these groups of dentists named for Eastern towns? I don’t know; possibly because it made them sound more professional, being from “back East”. They apparently operated out of the Kansas area, although they also claimed to have offices in Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin.

FtScottDailyTribuneKansas6/14/1911 - Newspapers.com
Ft. Scott Daily Tribune, Ft. Scott, Kansas, June 14, 1911.

Again, they do not state what they do (or don’t do) that makes their dentistry painless, so we can only guess. If you read the testimonials, they apparently had many satisfied customers. If they used some mixture of alcohol or cocaine, I’m not surprised they had happy customers (and pain-free procedures!

Painless Romine — Man of Mystery

Painless Dentist Oshkosh Northwestern, Wisconson, 7/2/1910 - New
The Menasha Record, Wisconsin, April 18, 1910.

One other dental group I identified in newspaper ads placed during the turn of the century was practicing painless dentistry in the Midwest — the Union Painless Dentists, fronted by a dentist by the name of Romine (sometimes misspelled “Romaine”). In the advertisements (one shown above), he is sometimes referred to as the Manager of the Union Painless Dentists.

While he may have started off as a real person, he eventually becomes a figurehead for the Union Painless Dentists. He is at first referred to as S.A. Romine, M.D.H.D, D.D.S., but after a few years, the advertisements I found simply refer to him as “Painless Romine”. I could not find any information regarding his dental degree, schooling, or town of origin. He claimed to make dentistry painless by way of drugs he had developed: Anzone, Man-No-Pain and Nox-U. Needless to say, the ads list no ingredients. They claim exclusivity to Union Painless Dentists and Dr. Romine.

Post_Crescent_AppletonWisc_June4_1910 - Newspapers.com
The Post Crescent, Appleton, Wisconsin, June 4, 1910.

Setting Up Shop

The method for the Union Painless Dentists and various other dental groups, was to create a permanent office in one town, then travel to surrounding towns and set up shop in local hotels. The dentists would advertise to the public that they were available to treat patients for a limited time in the temporary location.

Painless_Dentist_ad_LeotiStandard_Kansas_Jan12_1905 - Newspapers
Leoti Standard, Kansas, January 12, 1905.

It appears “Painless Romine” and the Union Painless Dentists continued until the early 1920s, or at least after that period ads were no longer in newspapers. By the 1920s, the Union Painless Dentists group was referred to as the Union Dental Company and they advertised “practically painless” dentistry, not completely painless dentistry. Perhaps their remedies weren’t so effective, after all.

“Painless Romine” had the last laugh, though, as this little newspaper blurb states.

Painless_Dentistry_SalinaKS_March 19_1920 - Newspapers.com
The Salina Daily Union, Kansas, March 19, 1920.

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

Dentists: Let’s celebrate #NationalTellAJokeDay

Jokes are one of the most classic ice breakers, mood lifters, and laugh inducers of all time – especially in the dental office.

So, it’s not a surprise that jokes have their own national day dedicated to all of the joy and giggles they bring about.

August 16th is National Tell a Joke Day, and it’s time to celebrate.

Jokes can be used in virtually any situation, considering there are infinite jokes about infinite things that relate to infinite situations, including dentistry.

Jokes can be the perfect antidote for nervous patients who may not enjoy trips to the dentist.

By lightening the mood and lessening the tension, telling simple, funny dental jokes may be the perfect way to ensure that all patients have enjoyable and low-stress visits.

Here are a few jokes to entertain any patient in your dental office:

  • What did the judge say to the dentist?
    Do you swear to pull the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth?
  • What do you call a dentist’s advice?
    His “fl-ossophy”
  • What does a member of the marching band use to brush his teeth?
    A tuba toothpaste
  • What’s a dentist’s favorite time of day?
    Tooth-thirty
  • What will a dentist give you for one dollar?
    Buck teeth
  • What’s a dentist’s favorite dance move?
    The floss

Additional benefits

Apart from making dentist visits more enjoyable for some patients, jokes also offer several other benefits related to laughter, such as:

  • Health benefits:
    • Increases production of infection fighting antibodies
    • Improves blood circulation
    • Increases production of endorphins
    •  Reduces stress
    • Soothes tension

Make sure to celebrate #NationalTellAJokeDay and make someone laugh! Let us know your favorite dentistry jokes if we missed them, too!

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron on how struggles lead to success #IE40Under40

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron, DMD, has been recognized as one of America’s Best Young Dentists, the 2019 Incisal Edge 40 Under 40 honorees.

Dr. Salmeron with Benco Dental Chairman and Customer Advocate Larry Cohen (left) at this year’s 40 Under 40 event in NYC.

This accomplishment, along with many other great feats, such as graduating from the top of her class at Case Western Reserve School of Dental Medicine (while also waiting tables at her local diner) and starting a new dental practice, Edge Endodontics in Austin, Texas, makes it clear that Dr. Salmeron is equipped with a ferocious and undying drive to succeed.

The Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine in Clevelang, Ohio.

Just as everyone faces difficult times, Dr. Salermon had struggles of her own to overcome while trying to pave the path for a career in dentistry.

Dr. Yuliya looked her troubles straight in the eye and came barreling at them, determined to overcome all of the odds pinned against her.

This determination and endless perseverance is the reason Dr. Yuliya Salmeron is where she is today.

Hardships growing up

Coming to the United States from Russia as a child, Dr. Yuliya had a bit more to work through than the average child.

The key to her success? Constantly staying positive. Her good attitude is responsible for all that she has and will continue to accomplish.

“I was hungry for a better life. My family was still in Russia, and I wanted to help them tremendously. Honestly, I had no time to be negative.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

This survival instinct sparked a fire in Dr. Salmeron, and she knew that she would stop at nothing to bring her family the life they deserve.

Despite this unwavering determination, Dr. Salmeron still admits that there were a few moments of fear and stress that made her question the achievability of her goals.

“The fear of failure came over me several times when I was going through college in my twenties; it caused a lot of stress.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

Overcoming the struggles

By remembering all that she had on the line – both in her family life and professional life – Dr. Salmeron learned to overcome the stress and not let it bother her, no matter how intense things seemed to get.

“Without the safety net of my parents to back me up, I stopped doubting myself and realized that the only way I could go was forward.”

Soaking up the family time

Today, Dr. Salmeron soaks up every minute of family time she is blessed with.

Dr. Salmeron’s two sons visit her at her practice, Edge Endodontics in Austin, Texas.

“One of the best parts about my family life is being with my boys and watching them grow. They are incredibly smart, and sometimes the best memories are made doing something as simple as watching cartoons with them,” Dr. Salmeron said.

Prioritizing her practice

Apart from her family life, Dr. Salmeron also enjoys making memories in her professional career.  She aims to make a difference in her patients’ lives every day.

Dr. Salmeron’s practice, Edge Endodontics in Austin, Texas.

“As an endodontist, I try to save my patients’ natural teeth, so seeing them right away is critical when they are in pain.  I aim to create a relaxing, almost spa-like experience when I perform procedures that alleviate any discomfort they might be having.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

Future Plans for her Practice

In the future, Dr. Salmeron plans to continue building upon her professional successes. Since her practice, Edge Endodontics, has only been up and running for a little over eight months, Dr. Salmeron recognizes that there’s still a lot of work to do.

“My goals include things like providing infinite support to my fellow dentists, as well as offering immediate appointments for emergency cases to relieve my patients’ pain,” Dr. Salmeron said.

Juggling it all

With running a new practice comes its own difficulties. Dr. Salmeron recognizes that there are still some roadblocks ahead, especially as a single parent in the field of dentistry.

“Juggling motherhood, personal relationships and my professional career is sometimes exhausting and very challenging,” Dr. Salmeron said. “Most people say it’s important to find a balance, but I don’t think there is one.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron, DMD.

Dr. Salmeron realizes that it’s impossible to do all things well. Some days are more centered around her practice and other days around her kids. In the end, she has to remind herself of the sacrifices she’s making to ensure her kids have a good, solid future ahead of them.

Her advice to other doctors

In the end, Dr. Salmeron urges all others in similar situations to remind themselves that working hard doesn’t make you a bad mother, partner, friend, or anything along the lines.

Dr. Salmeron is looking forward to the challenges her future career will hold. The bigger the challenge, the better-suited doctor she will become.

“Opposition is good. Just as lifting heavier weights in the gym builds a stronger muscle, facing a harder challenge builds a better professional.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron