MOM Pittsburgh: An oral health three-peat

This year, as of 3 a.m. on Friday, July 26, over 250 people were already lined up outside PPG Paints Arena – the city’s downtown hockey arena. A few hours later at 6 a.m., the 2019 Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh Free Dental Clinic opened its doors to the community.

In the two days that followed, 1,302 patients received hope and healing at the hands of 1,469 care providers. The clinic provides services at no charge to adults and children age 2 and up; there are no income or eligibility requirements. Patients – many from working families – attend because they lack dental insurance or access to dental care.

Photos courtesy TeleTrackingTechnologies

A solution born out of need

The idea for establishing an annual dental care event in Pittsburgh was born out of conversations between Dr. Daniel Pituch; Dr. Richard M. Celko; and Michael Zamagias, chairman and chief executive officer of the Pittsburgh-based healthcare technology company TeleTracking Technologies, Inc., who together saw the need in the community to provide this service on an annual basis.

In 2017 it came to fruition in the form of Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh, a free, two-day dental clinic, presented by A Call to Care, a Pittsburgh-based nonprofit 501(c)3 organization.

Photos courtesy TeleTrackingTechnologies

‘No patient is turned away due to lack of capacity’

What keeps it rolling? The entire event is run and staffed by volunteers.

  • 176 Dentists (9 Endodontists, 7 Non-clinical, 11 Pediatric Dentists, 4 Prosthodontists, 4 Radiologists, 73 Restorative, 5 Routing, 46 Surgery, 17 Triage)
  • 90 Hygienists
  • 164 TeleTracking employees

Hear them in action in an NPR report by WESA’s Katie Blackley: https://www.npr.org/2019/08/01/747190755/1-300-wait-for-free-dental-care-in-pittsburgh?fbclid=IwAR21gRHACVlx8Qx3r41sJ_skLDvaJBenFg9qAT5dHyIjJT4f4WWpNy8IM9c

The costs of presenting (PPG Paints Arena rental, materials, dental equipment, supplies, and more) are made possible by the generosity of dedicated partners, sponsors and funders, according to Kayleigh Fontana, Marketing Campaign Manager for TeleTracking.com

Dr. Gordon Christiansen, Founder and CEO of Practical Clinical Courses, with Benco Dental’s Jim Stoyanoff, who attended the July event in support. Benco invited two Equipment Support Technicians to donate their time and labor for the entirety of the two-day event. Also the dental distributor donated $5,000 in merchandise discounts and more than 300 volunteer hours by Benco associates.

“The clinic has grown each year, increasing the number of dental chairs (from 50 chairs in 2017 to 100 chairs in 2019) and volunteers each year to meet the need. No patient is turned away due to lack of capacity.”

Kayleigh Fontana, Marketing Campaign Manager for TeleTracking.com
One of the Mission Leaders Richard M. Celko, DMD, MBA, with a patient at the 2019 event.

How does it make a difference?

By establishing this clinic as an annual event, Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh makes it possible for individuals with limited access to dental care to see a dental professional at least once a year.

Services provided include:
* full dental exam,
* X-rays,
* cleanings,
* minor restorative fillings,
* extractions,
* root canal treatments on select teeth,
* oral hygiene instruction, and
* temporary partial dental appliances

Data gathered from a survey of Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh patients in 2018 revealed that 45 percent of patients who attended the clinic had experienced dental pain for more than a year, and 25 percent reported visiting the emergency department for dental pain.
Research shows that poor oral health has a significant impact on overall health, including premature birth and an increased risk of cancer. The bacteria present in oral infections has been found to contribute to the risk for heart disease and stroke. Studies have found that having damaged, broken or missing teeth impacts an individual’s sense of confidence, well-being, and employability, as well as earning power.
Photos courtesy TeleTracking Technologies

Want to participate in 2020?

For news on the 2020 Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh dental clinic, and opportunities to volunteer next year, follow Mission of Mercy Pittsburgh on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/MOMPGH/ and Twitter @MOM_PGH.

Want to donate or volunteer? Visit: https://mompgh.org/donate/

The Lucy Hobbs Way

While we generally profile great women from dentistry’s past, we do not want to neglect any woman of the past who has advanced the cause of equality for women and the advancement of society in general. On the run-up to the 100th anniversary of American women getting the vote (women were enfranchised via the 19th amendment on August 26, 1920) we are profiling a woman who worked tirelessly for others in the medical field as a nurse and also championed women’s right to vote – Mary Bartlett Dixon Cullen. She displayed the tenacity and persistence, along with the will to make things better, that we at Benco Dental and the entire Lucy Hobbs Project hope to support in today’s women dentists.

Mary-Bartlett_Dixon_Photo - Newspapers.com
Photo from The Baltimore Evening Sun, August 14, 1912.

Mary was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1873. Her father, William T. Dixon, was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University Hospital before becoming President of the hospital; he also owned the Dixon-Bartlett Company and was president of the National Exchange Bank. Mary Bartlett Dixon was admitted to the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, as many other young women were starting to do, as the Civil War had opened that career up for females.

At the time of her enrollment, the student nurses worked longer hours than the Principal of the School of Nursing, Adelaide Nutting, thought they should. She figured with the President of the university’s daughter enrolled, he would see and hopefully, reduce, the number of hours the nurses toiled. This strategy worked, and Mr. Dixon reduced the hours, however; Miss Dixon worked twice as hard as her peers and graduated in 1903.

No Longer Neutral

As she started working, Mary chafed at the neutral stance nurses were expected to exhibit in the face of political inequality. At one point, she wrote a letter to the editor of the American Journal of Nurses criticizing the journal’s neutral position on women’s suffrage. She rapidly realized that one could not separate women’s health with women’s rights – they were undeniably linked. How could you improve people’s health if you couldn’t improve their lot politically? In October 1908, Dixon published an essay titled “Votes for Women” in the Nurses’ Journal of the Pacific Coast. Dixon asserted, “no other issue or matter could be attended to until nurses were politically oriented.” She urged nurses to find out the voting laws in each state, as some states (particularly in the West) allowed women to vote in local elections, although by the early 1900s, if a state had allowed women to vote in certain elections, they might have revoked such rights and no woman could vote in a national election. Most states had some combination of rules that allowed almost any one, (sometimes they needed to own property) over the age of 21 and who lived in a community for one year to be eligible to vote ‘except women, children, idiots, and criminals,” Mary found.

Pushing Ahead

By October 1909, Mary was the chairman of the Woman’s Suffrage Association of Maryland, compiling a pamphlet championing the cause of women to vote. Along with working tirelessly for suffrage, she continued her nursing. She worried that there was no nursing school or hospital in Easton, the seat of Talbot County, Maryland.  In 1907, she and Elizabeth Wright set up a school of nursing with no money – it was all staffed by volunteers. The school eventually became the MacQueen Gibbs Willis School of Nursing and then part of the Allied Health program at Chesapeake College. She was also the founder of the Talbot County Children’s Aid Society.

Not Afraid to Suffer for the Cause

Mary_Bartlett_Dixon_groupphoto
Caption: “Some of the picket line of Nov. 10, 1917.” Left to right: Mrs. Catherine Martinette, Eagle Grove, Iowa. Mrs. William Kent, Kentfield, California. Miss Mary Bartlett Dixon, Easton, Md. Mrs. C.T. Robertson, Salt Lake City, Utah. Miss Cora Week, New York City. Miss Amy Ju[e]ngling, Buffalo, N.Y. Miss Hattie Kruger, Buffalo, N.Y. Miss Belle Sheinberg, N.Y.C. Miss Julia Emory, Baltimore, Md.

Credit: Photograph by Harris & Ewing, Washington, D.C., November 10, 1917. Cropped version of the photograph published in The Suffragist 5, no. 95 (Nov. 17, 1917). Available from the Library of Congress, National Woman’s Party Records, Group II, Container II:276, Folder: Group Photographs Nos. 77-87, and online at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/mnwp.276023.

A few years later the issue of women’s suffrage was facing several important votes. A portion of the suffrage movement known as the National Woman’s Party led by suffragist Alice Paul became the first “cause” to picket outside the White House. The ladies marched with signs and held mostly peaceful protests. In March 1913, Woodrow Wilson received the first suffragists in the White House—led by Alice Paul, and including Mary Bartlett Dixon and three others. Because state level suffrage was met with great resistance, suffragists like Dixon knew that a constitutional amendment was the only way to gain equality everywhere. On November 10, 1917, Dixon posed with a group of women protestors for a photograph including the suffrage banner and a critique of President Wilson. That day, Dixon was arrested for picketing the White House. She was sent to the Occoquan Workhouse along with many other suffragists.

Unstoppable

Mary_Bartlett_Dixon_float - Newspapers.com
Image of Mary Bartlett Dixon on a float in front of the Talbot County Courthouse, circa 1911-1912. The Easton Star Democrat, April 5, 2018.

This stint in the workhouse apparently did not stop Mary from continuing her quest for universal suffrage. She went back to Maryland and continued the fight.

Gaining the Vote

Mary Bartlett Dixon was married shortly before she gained the right to vote. She married Dr. Thomas S. Cullen, a gynecologist at Johns Hopkins, in a small ceremony surrounded by family on April 6, 1920.

Last Accolades

In 1949 the Board of the Memorial Hospital of Easton decided to name establish a new fund in Mary’s name, the Mary Bartlett Dixon Cullen fund for Nursing Education.

After her husband died in 1953, she donated her Baltimore home to the American Cancer Society.

A Quaker, she was a member of the Friends Meeting in Easton, Maryland. Mary Bartlett Dixon Cullen died on September 6, 1957, at her home, Moreling Chance, near Easton. She was buried in Spring Hill Cemetery, in Easton, Talbot County, Maryland.

For more information on the unsung life of Mary Bartlett Dixon, see this biographical sketch here.

For more information on the Benco Dental Lucy Hobbs Project, supporting women in dentistry, click here.

IMG_7400
Some modern-day suffragettes, displaying their colors at a vintage event.

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

3 steps to get started designing your dental practice

Dentist and architect Dr. Tristan Hamilton will guide attendees at a Build Your Future event Sept. 19 and 20. America’s leading design workshops – specifically created for dentists— offer insight on interior design, architecture, financing your project and readying your team for the transformation.

Register today for the two- day September event that will be hosted at Benco Dental’s CenterPoint East in Pittston, Pennsylvania. Call 1.800.GOBENCO or see your Friendly Benco Dental Rep for details. More: https://www.facebook.com/events/2229545497362002/?ti=icl

In a recent interview, Dr. Hamilton shared three steps to get started on designing your dental practice. His guidance helps turn what might seem like a daunting concept into an exciting, rewarding experience.

1. Select the right team

Just like picking the right employees for a dental practice team is so important, picking the right team for designing a practice is vital, too, said Dr. Hamilton. Contact a dental Equipment Specialist, all of the other aspects of your timeline will fall into place.

Staying in contact with a dental Equipment Specialist is especially important because she or he can offer insight on topics like which contractors deliver projects on time, and on budget and created amazing outcomes. The same goes when selecting to select the right architect and interior designer.

As soon as all of your team members are in place, the process will flow smoothly.

2. Create a mission portfolio

Also known as vision boards, mission portfolios allow doctors to view their goals and inspirations. These portfolios act as a check and balance system between the doctor’s wants and the project itself.

Since there are so many working parts todesigning an office, it’s important to keep track of all of them.

The mission portfolios offer a platform to answer questions such as:

  • How many operatories will the practice have?
  • Do you want an existing space, or would you prefer to build one?
  • How much external car traffic do you seek outside of your practice?
    • Are you aiming for pedestrian traffic?

Sites like Houzz.com or Pinterest allow doctors to set up all of their favorite inspirations in one list. Having this list leads to better communication with the interior designers, which ultimately results in an amazing animation of the client’s needs and the designer’s ideas.

3. Attend a Build Your Future workshop

As much as dental school prepares doctors for the day-to-day challenges they may face at a dental practice, a Build Your Future workshop explains all of the intricate parts involved with designing a practice.

These workshops offer the information to create the perfect space for both a practice and patients.

The Build Your Future Workshops address designing an office from start to finish, so doctors are fully prepared take the project head on.

Advice, information and guidance will prevent any pitfalls when actually in the process of designing a practice that will support the rest of a successful dental career.

Those interested in viewing a schedule for Dr. Hamilton’s Build Your Future workshops can do so here.

Dr. Tristan Hamilton presents at a Build Your Future event hosted in June.

What can you expect?

Earn up to 8.5 CE credits at dentistry’s leading design workshop featuring keynote speaker Tristan Hamilton, DDS, M. Arch.

Also featuring:

  • “Financing- Putting it All Together” with Charles Loretto, Partner, Cain Watters & Associates President, National Dental Placements
  • “Practice Management Coaching” with Kay Huff, Benco Dental Director of Dental Coaching.
  • “The Power of Interior Design” with Melissa Sprau, NCIDQ, Benco Dental, Manager, CenterPoint Design

Details:
Accomplish the following objectives —
• Walk away with a foundation of how a properly designed office can increase production and efficiency.

• Learn what constitutes an effective floor plan.

• Know how to get the right people on your team to help you achieve the low stress office design you need to succeed.

• Discover what makes a patient more anxious in your office and how you can alleviate it.

Creating anaward-winning office isn’t as hard as it seems

Again, it all comes down to the team. Once all of the positions are filled, from Equipment Specialist to Interior Designer, the foundation for an award-winning office will be built.

Just like your team is important for the initial creation ofyour space, it’s important for any redesigning you may choose to do, too.

Having the right team in place is vital to achieving things like compassionate aesthetic, circulation, patient experience and dental team efficiency.

“In order to keep the humanity of dentistry in place, all of these goals much be achieved. Dentists must be able to view their practice through a compassionate lens to create a space where their patients are comfortable.”

Dr. Tristan Hamilton

Everything from the colors on the walls down to your choice of furnishing can help create a practice that destroys dental phobias and hence becomes an award-winning practice.

With the right team, all of these goals can be so easily reached.

Read More »

Practically Painless Dentistry?

A group of dentists working together in a central location and offering all sorts of dental procedures, painlessly – that’s a modern invention, right? Wrong! Back at the turn of the last century, there were several dental groups that advertised “Painless Dentistry”.

False Advertising

Painless_dentist_SpokaneChronicleWash_oct21_1904 - Newspapers.co

How painless were they? It’s hard to determine that now, but several made that claim. The first outfit I came across that advertised “…teeth extracted, filled or crowned without pain…” was the Boston Painless Dentists (shown at left), advertising, not in Boston, but way out in Seattle, Portland, and Tacoma in 1904. My first thought was that they were probably using cocaine, or some other now-banned drug to help with the pain. They did not reveal their pain-relief methods.

Then there was the Chicago Painless Dentists (shown below), again, not practicing in Chicago, but in Portland, Oregon. They claimed to extract teeth, “…WITHOUT PAIN. Nothing inhaled – no gas, no chloroform or ether – and above all, no cocaine…” That sounds good, doesn’t it? Possibly better than the Boston Painless Dentists.

A Fairy Tale You Say?

Moving East toward the middle of the United States, we run into the New York Painless Dentists (shown below). Why are all these groups of dentists named for Eastern towns? I don’t know; possibly because it made them sound more professional, being from “back East”. They apparently operated out of the Kansas area, although they also claimed to have offices in Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin.

FtScottDailyTribuneKansas6/14/1911 - Newspapers.com
Ft. Scott Daily Tribune, Ft. Scott, Kansas, June 14, 1911.

Again, they do not state what they do (or don’t do) that makes their dentistry painless, so we can only guess. If you read the testimonials, they apparently had many satisfied customers. If they used some mixture of alcohol or cocaine, I’m not surprised they had happy customers (and pain-free procedures!

Painless Romine — Man of Mystery

Painless Dentist Oshkosh Northwestern, Wisconson, 7/2/1910 - New
The Menasha Record, Wisconsin, April 18, 1910.

One other dental group I identified in newspaper ads placed during the turn of the century was practicing painless dentistry in the Midwest — the Union Painless Dentists, fronted by a dentist by the name of Romine (sometimes misspelled “Romaine”). In the advertisements (one shown above), he is sometimes referred to as the Manager of the Union Painless Dentists.

While he may have started off as a real person, he eventually becomes a figurehead for the Union Painless Dentists. He is at first referred to as S.A. Romine, M.D.H.D, D.D.S., but after a few years, the advertisements I found simply refer to him as “Painless Romine”. I could not find any information regarding his dental degree, schooling, or town of origin. He claimed to make dentistry painless by way of drugs he had developed: Anzone, Man-No-Pain and Nox-U. Needless to say, the ads list no ingredients. They claim exclusivity to Union Painless Dentists and Dr. Romine.

Post_Crescent_AppletonWisc_June4_1910 - Newspapers.com
The Post Crescent, Appleton, Wisconsin, June 4, 1910.

Setting Up Shop

The method for the Union Painless Dentists and various other dental groups, was to create a permanent office in one town, then travel to surrounding towns and set up shop in local hotels. The dentists would advertise to the public that they were available to treat patients for a limited time in the temporary location.

Painless_Dentist_ad_LeotiStandard_Kansas_Jan12_1905 - Newspapers
Leoti Standard, Kansas, January 12, 1905.

It appears “Painless Romine” and the Union Painless Dentists continued until the early 1920s, or at least after that period ads were no longer in newspapers. By the 1920s, the Union Painless Dentists group was referred to as the Union Dental Company and they advertised “practically painless” dentistry, not completely painless dentistry. Perhaps their remedies weren’t so effective, after all.

“Painless Romine” had the last laugh, though, as this little newspaper blurb states.

Painless_Dentistry_SalinaKS_March 19_1920 - Newspapers.com
The Salina Daily Union, Kansas, March 19, 1920.

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

Dentists: Let’s celebrate #NationalTellAJokeDay

Jokes are one of the most classic ice breakers, mood lifters, and laugh inducers of all time – especially in the dental office.

So, it’s not a surprise that jokes have their own national day dedicated to all of the joy and giggles they bring about.

August 16th is National Tell a Joke Day, and it’s time to celebrate.

Jokes can be used in virtually any situation, considering there are infinite jokes about infinite things that relate to infinite situations, including dentistry.

Jokes can be the perfect antidote for nervous patients who may not enjoy trips to the dentist.

By lightening the mood and lessening the tension, telling simple, funny dental jokes may be the perfect way to ensure that all patients have enjoyable and low-stress visits.

Here are a few jokes to entertain any patient in your dental office:

  • What did the judge say to the dentist?
    Do you swear to pull the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth?
  • What do you call a dentist’s advice?
    His “fl-ossophy”
  • What does a member of the marching band use to brush his teeth?
    A tuba toothpaste
  • What’s a dentist’s favorite time of day?
    Tooth-thirty
  • What will a dentist give you for one dollar?
    Buck teeth
  • What’s a dentist’s favorite dance move?
    The floss

Additional benefits

Apart from making dentist visits more enjoyable for some patients, jokes also offer several other benefits related to laughter, such as:

  • Health benefits:
    • Increases production of infection fighting antibodies
    • Improves blood circulation
    • Increases production of endorphins
    •  Reduces stress
    • Soothes tension

Make sure to celebrate #NationalTellAJokeDay and make someone laugh! Let us know your favorite dentistry jokes if we missed them, too!

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron on how struggles lead to success #IE40Under40

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron, DMD, has been recognized as one of America’s Best Young Dentists, the 2019 Incisal Edge 40 Under 40 honorees.

Dr. Salmeron with Benco Dental Chairman and Customer Advocate Larry Cohen (left) at this year’s 40 Under 40 event in NYC.

This accomplishment, along with many other great feats, such as graduating from the top of her class at Case Western Reserve School of Dental Medicine (while also waiting tables at her local diner) and starting a new dental practice, Edge Endodontics in Austin, Texas, makes it clear that Dr. Salmeron is equipped with a ferocious and undying drive to succeed.

The Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine in Clevelang, Ohio.

Just as everyone faces difficult times, Dr. Salermon had struggles of her own to overcome while trying to pave the path for a career in dentistry.

Dr. Yuliya looked her troubles straight in the eye and came barreling at them, determined to overcome all of the odds pinned against her.

This determination and endless perseverance is the reason Dr. Yuliya Salmeron is where she is today.

Hardships growing up

Coming to the United States from Russia as a child, Dr. Yuliya had a bit more to work through than the average child.

The key to her success? Constantly staying positive. Her good attitude is responsible for all that she has and will continue to accomplish.

“I was hungry for a better life. My family was still in Russia, and I wanted to help them tremendously. Honestly, I had no time to be negative.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

This survival instinct sparked a fire in Dr. Salmeron, and she knew that she would stop at nothing to bring her family the life they deserve.

Despite this unwavering determination, Dr. Salmeron still admits that there were a few moments of fear and stress that made her question the achievability of her goals.

“The fear of failure came over me several times when I was going through college in my twenties; it caused a lot of stress.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

Overcoming the struggles

By remembering all that she had on the line – both in her family life and professional life – Dr. Salmeron learned to overcome the stress and not let it bother her, no matter how intense things seemed to get.

“Without the safety net of my parents to back me up, I stopped doubting myself and realized that the only way I could go was forward.”

Soaking up the family time

Today, Dr. Salmeron soaks up every minute of family time she is blessed with.

Dr. Salmeron’s two sons visit her at her practice, Edge Endodontics in Austin, Texas.

“One of the best parts about my family life is being with my boys and watching them grow. They are incredibly smart, and sometimes the best memories are made doing something as simple as watching cartoons with them,” Dr. Salmeron said.

Prioritizing her practice

Apart from her family life, Dr. Salmeron also enjoys making memories in her professional career.  She aims to make a difference in her patients’ lives every day.

Dr. Salmeron’s practice, Edge Endodontics in Austin, Texas.

“As an endodontist, I try to save my patients’ natural teeth, so seeing them right away is critical when they are in pain.  I aim to create a relaxing, almost spa-like experience when I perform procedures that alleviate any discomfort they might be having.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

Future Plans for her Practice

In the future, Dr. Salmeron plans to continue building upon her professional successes. Since her practice, Edge Endodontics, has only been up and running for a little over eight months, Dr. Salmeron recognizes that there’s still a lot of work to do.

“My goals include things like providing infinite support to my fellow dentists, as well as offering immediate appointments for emergency cases to relieve my patients’ pain,” Dr. Salmeron said.

Juggling it all

With running a new practice comes its own difficulties. Dr. Salmeron recognizes that there are still some roadblocks ahead, especially as a single parent in the field of dentistry.

“Juggling motherhood, personal relationships and my professional career is sometimes exhausting and very challenging,” Dr. Salmeron said. “Most people say it’s important to find a balance, but I don’t think there is one.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron, DMD.

Dr. Salmeron realizes that it’s impossible to do all things well. Some days are more centered around her practice and other days around her kids. In the end, she has to remind herself of the sacrifices she’s making to ensure her kids have a good, solid future ahead of them.

Her advice to other doctors

In the end, Dr. Salmeron urges all others in similar situations to remind themselves that working hard doesn’t make you a bad mother, partner, friend, or anything along the lines.

Dr. Salmeron is looking forward to the challenges her future career will hold. The bigger the challenge, the better-suited doctor she will become.

“Opposition is good. Just as lifting heavier weights in the gym builds a stronger muscle, facing a harder challenge builds a better professional.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

Dental innovation in the air

The nation’s largest family-owned dental distributor strives to make it simple to stay up to date with the latest equipment and technology. 
As summer winds to its end, Benco Dental breezes in with a few advancements to consider, in the form of its Six Neat Things promotion.

The Six Neat Things featured from August 9 to 29 are, from left: TNN Needle Guide, GCI Tri Plaque ID Gel, Banditt Xtra Grip Forceps, Optimum+ NiTi Rotary Files, Ivoclar Vivadent’s Ivoclean and Mora Systems.

Bend Septodont Evolution needles more easily with the TNN Needle Guide

The TNN Needle Guide will allow dentists to more safely and effectively bend a Septodont Evolution needle to the 90° – 130° angle needed for the TNN Technique.

The TNN Needle Guide from Septodont provides pre-sterilization for single-use that protects patients from cross-contamination.

The TNN Needle Guide offers several features and benefits, which include:

The TNN Needle Guide allows needles to be more easily bent for dental procedures.
  • Guide for bending dental needles prior to use
  • Pre-sterilization for single-use that protects patients from cross-contamination
  • Groove to apply device to cannula of needle to protect against needle-stick injuries.

The guides can also be used in other dental procedures where dentists determine the need.

For more information on the TNN Needle Guide, click here.

Help your patients rid their teeth of stubborn plaque with the GC Tri Plaque ID Gel

This product allows patients to easily visualize the areas where they should concentrate and improve their brushing and flossing routine. It identifies areas were plaque still remains after teeth have been brushed.

The GC Tri Plaque ID Gel from GC America.

The GC Tri Plaque ID Gel offers several benefits, which include:

  • Ease of application and removal
  • Ability to assess the effect of dietary changes
  • Identification new, old, and extra-high caries risk plaque
  • Inclusion of sucrose to enhance acid-producing plaque

For more information on the GCI Tri Plaque ID Gel, click here.

Extend the life of your extraction forceps with the new Banditt Xtra Grip forceps

A Titan’s black Diamond Nano composite coating offers unique properties from natural diamonds, which gives the forceps a high micro-hardness, exceptional resistance when it comes to corrosion and even resistance to abrasive wear for up to 50 years. 

The Banditt Xtra Grip Forceps from A Titan.

These forceps offer many beneficial qualities that set them apart from their competitors:

  • Scratch-resistant
  • Corrosion resistant
  • Non-reflective in patients’ mouths

Additionally, the beaks of the forceps reduce hard- and soft-tissue damage. They also offer new beak innovation with biomechanics grooves that provide an unparalleled grip, compared to other forceps on the market.

Read more about the Banditt Xtra Grip Forceps here.

Efficiently and safely shape canals with the Optimum+ NiTi Rotary files

This Benco Brands system offers file-to-file matches to other brands.

The different options offered from the Optimum+ NiTi Rotary files shown above.

The Optimum+ NiTi Rotary files are compatible with the same motor, handpiece and setting as the other brands, so there’s no transition time.

Benefits of the Optimum+ NiTi Rotary files include:

  • Shortened shaping time
  • Compatibility with existing handpieces and settings
  • Allowances for a wide range of canal morphologies

More information on the Optimum+ NiTi Rotary files can be found here.

Promote the formation of strong, permanent bonds with Ivoclar Vivadent’s Ivoclean

This universal paste effectively cleans the bonding surfaces of dental restorations that have been contaminated after intraoral try-in to create optimum conditions for the adhesive luting procedure.

Ivoclar Vivadent’s Ivoclean.

Ivoclean effectively cleans all types of restorative materials:

  • Glass-ceramics
  • Zirconium oxide ceramics
  • Aluminum oxide ceramics
  • Precious metal alloys
  • Base metal alloys
  • Lab-fabricated composite restorations

The economic and time-saving gel allows the try-in of pretreated restorations.

Click here to learn more about Ivoclar Vivadent’s Ivoclean.

Simplify office spaces and create better patient connections with Mora cabinetry

Mora from Herman Miller is a versatile casework solution that furnishes spaces across a facility and keeps people focused on each other.

A showcase of some of the work included in the Mora System by Herman Miller.

Mora cabinetry offers an alternative to traditional millwork and provides clean lines, thoughtful features and the ability for customization.

What does Mora offer?

  • Short lead times
  • Modularity
  • Field-replaceable parts
  • Modern healthcare design

Mora offers simple, yet elegant design features, all while keeping its functionality at the forefront of its purpose. This system allows doctors to achieve beautiful, well-running, practical office spaces.

‘Working Interferences’ podcast takes on ‘Incisal Edge’s’ 32 Most Influential issue—IE responds!

Drs. Joshua Austin and Lance Timmerman host the Working Interferences podcast, a lighthearted (and NSFW) window into their views on dentistry. While the show itself might not ring a bell, you know Dr. Austin from his popular column in Dental Economics, Pearls For Your Practice, while Dr. Timmerman is a noted practitioner, lecturer and opinion leader.

On Episode 81 they “lost their minds” according to the show’s description over Incisal Edge‘s annual list of the 32 Most Influential people in dentistry, and “spent 30 minutes hyperventilating https://www.incisaledgemagazine.com/mag/category/32-most-influential-people/about the insanity.” They had more than a few harsh words, but according to the Incisal Edge team:

“We happily take the criticism from two guys who certainly don’t take themselves too seriously.”

Incisal Edge editorial team

Just for fun, here are the 23 most attention-getting comments heard, along with Incisal Edge thoughts in response. Says Incisal Edge Editor Ed Kobesky, “Maybe they’ll like this list better.”

1. “I don’t mean to throw shade at the good people at Benco Dental. The most I’ve ever gotten paid per minute to lecture was by Benco.”

[pauses podcast] Get me someone in accounting.

2. “Did we make [the list]? I feel like, there’s definitely no way we’re going to be number one, two or three. If we’re going to be there, we’re going to be at the end.”

Sorry. There’s always 2020.

3. “Lodestar? I don’t know that word.”

Referring to our description of #2, the new breed of Entrepreneurial Dentists who are not solo, not DSO, not fully corporate. OK, we’ll admit, “lodestar” is kind of a fifty-cent word.

4. “That’s all he does is s–t post.”

In fairness, that’s not all #3, Howard Farran, does. In between those so-called s–t posts, he founded an important media empire that includes 25-year-strong Dentaltown magazine, plus dentistry’s first and still leading social platform with about a quarter-million registered users.

5. “I have no idea what she does.”

#7, Martha Somerman of the NIDCR, oversees a $462 million research budget, 81 percent of which is directed at oral health. That’s a lot of millions and a lot of clout.

6. “Jimmy G!”

We like Jim Glidewell (#9) a bunch too.

7. “You can sit on it, Alex and Jordan, you millennial bastards.”

Smile Direct Club (#11) and its founders are certainly making waves. We report, you decide.

8. “It’s all ball bearings.”

This in response to Straumann’s outgoing CEO, Marco Gadola (#12) and the hosts’ contention that the company’s products aren’t especially noteworthy.

9. “We love this guy, we talk about him every show. Gordo!”

#13, the one and only Gordon Christensen of course. We love this guy too. Wait…did we just agree?

10. “A total d–khead.”

Regarding Paul Gosar (R-AZ), one of five lawmaker-dentists sharing the #14 spot. In fact, six of Gosar’s siblings did publicly endorse his opponent. Ouch.

11. “Just because you’re a dentist doesn’t mean d–k.”

Again, regarding the five lawmaker-dentists.

12. “I don’t even know what the f— Park Dental is.”

But you should! The company doubled in size in just a few years thanks to #17, owner Paul Gulon.

13. “Michael, I owe you my life, I owe you my career, you’re an amazing person.”

Regarding SSC founder Michael Cohen, #18 on the list.

14. “Yeah, but I guess she, like, saved some peoples’ lives with that water stuff.”

Regarding anti-sugar lobby crusader, Cristin Kearns, #20 who we likened to the Erin Brockovich of dentistry. We guess she, like, is only singlehandedly taking on the food equivalent of Big Tobacco. Small potatoes. Pfff.

15. “It would help if they would explain why.”

Regarding the reasoning behind our picks, and for the record we did thoroughly explain each one.

16. “Should be one, two or three. He’s the influencer.”

Regarding #23, John Kois.

17. “Take a long walk off a short pier, Incisal Edge magazine, for putting this blowhard on this list.”

Regarding blogger, lifestyle maven and charcoal toothpaste evangelist, #24, Lauren Evarts of TheSkinnyConfidential.com. Are patients pestering you about charcoal toothpaste? We bet they are, and here’s an important reason why. Just sayin.’

18. “The guy runs a stupid Facebook group.”

16,000+ group members might disagree regarding #25, Paul Goodman, founder of Dental Nachos.

19. “How on earth is Paul Goodman above Frank Spear? What are we doing!”

If this were a lifetime achievement awards, we’d wholeheartedly agree. But influence shifts year to year.

20. “I just want to throw my computer through a wall.”

Please don’t do that…not on our account!

21. “The janitor that cleans up at the Spear center after Frank lectures should be higher on the list than Paul Goodman.”

Jeez, does Goodman owe you two guys money or something?

22. “Chuck Cohen, owner of Benco, come on this show and please explain this to me. Open invite.”

He’s busy that day.

23. “What do you think Beto O’Rourke does?”

Regarding whether #30 on our list, ahem, relieves himself standing up or sitting down. This feels like a good place to stop.

Dr. Janice Doan to lead third location of A+Family Dentistry #IE40Under40

It all comes back to family

An alum of the Incisal Edge’s 2015 40 Under 40, Dr. Janice Doan never rests on her laurels – she continues demonstrate her hard working and ambition every day.

In recent years, Dr. Doan has made several advancements in her professional life as well as in her family’s practice, A+ Family Dentistry. These depict how dedication to career can result in endless opportunities for connection and empowerment.

Yesterday, A+ Family Dentistry announced that in addition to their locations in Poway and El Cajon, they are opening a third office in Sorrento Valley in mid-August. Founded by Dr. Justene Doan and Dr. Roger Tran in 2002, this family owned dentistry has been providing affordable dental care service to the San Diego community for over 17 years.


“With the two offices that are already established in different areas, the Sorrento Valley location will be managed by my sister Dr. Janice Doan to provide comprehensive dental care at affordable costs for those residing between Poway and San Diego.”

Dr. Justene Doan
Dr. Janice Doan holds the key to the A+ Family Dental location in Sorrento Valley which she will manage.

Community activist

Dr. Janice Doan

The further she advances in her dental career, the more Dr. Doan is recognized for her wisdom and abundance of knowledge.

A community activist, Dr. Janice Doan has also been volunteering and participating in various programs in the community including one called Give Back a Smile or GBAS. This program was established to connect eligible survivors of domestic and/or sexual violence who’ve received dental injuries from the abuse with volunteer cosmetic dentists throughout the United States and Canada.


“This year, the program I have volunteered for is to provide dental care to a domestic violence survivor who suffers from teeth injuries. The patient that I am working with suffered a life-altering situation that affects her smile and her well-being. As it is something that everyone sees and is such a major physical attribute, a smile can affect every aspect of life.”

“At A+ Family dentistry, we make it a point to let patients know that we’re here to help. Not only the dentists and the office want to help, but the businesses that support our dental office as well. One of our labs was also able to contribute the parts and ceramics imperative for this patient’s well-being, free of charge. Thanks to the GBAS program, she can now live her life as she was meant to, happily and with a gorgeous smile.”

Dr. Janice Doan

In need of support?

Those who needs help through GBAS can call the toll free number at (800)773-GBAS (4227), or email givebackasmile@aacd.com For more information visit http://www.givebackasmile.com.

Action to Win

Dr. Janice Doan has been sharing advice on topics such as freedom in the workplace and the empowerment of women in dentistry across several different platforms.

On August 9 and 10, Dr. Doan will be speaking at the “Action to Win” event at the Catamaran Resort in San Diego, California. The event unites dentists from all over the world to discuss how to create profitable, impactful and enjoyable businesses.

Dr. Janice Doan featured in the “Action to Win” flyer.

Dr. Doan will speak about her role as a Community Influencer at this year’s event.

“I want to create a massive impact that will have a positive ripple effect not just in my own community, but also worldwide. A community isn’t just where I live, it’s who I connect with and who I can help.”

Dr. Janice Doan

The Dentist Freedom Blueprint

Dr. Doan was also able to share her wisdom when she featured as a guest on Dr. David Phelps’ podcast, “The Dentist Freedom Blueprint”.

Dr. David Phelps’ “The Dentist Freedom Blueprint”.

“The ultimate goal is freedom physically, financially, and spiritually, and what that means for each person. For me, it is being able to prioritize and be willing to sacrifice some things for others so that I can reach my goals,” Dr. Doan said.

Dr. Doan reflects on what she was doing well in her professional career and figures out how to duplicate her areas of success. Ultimately, Dr. Doan aims to create systems that work well and are simple enough for everyone to adopt.

Family life: Leading by example

Dr. Doan also showcased how her professional life relates to her family life. In regard to her five-year-old son, Jake, Dr. Doan said she often teaches him the how to handle the basics of life through leading by example.

She enjoys watching her son pick up on these behaviors and eventually implement them.

Dr. Janice Doan smiles with her 5-year-old son, Jake (left).

“For example, I went to the gym for my workout. Jake came with me and wanted to do what I was doing. He and I had a great training session at the gym with my trainer,” Dr. Doan said.

Dr. Doan loves watching her son adapt and pick up on the positive habits she sets forth for him. Family has and continues to be a staple in Dr. Doan’s life.

Gaining strength through strife

Family holds such a special place in Dr. Doan’s heart mostly because of the hardships she and her family first encountered when they arrived in the United States from Vietnam.

As a child, Dr. Doan grew up with her brother and sister, all of who were raised by their grandparents. Absent from their early childhood lives were their parents, who were raising their youngest brother in a different city.

Childhood photo of Dr. Janice Doan and her family.

Dr. Doan said growing up without her parents around was difficult, but she knew what they were sacrificing to ensure that she and her siblings would have plentiful, successful lives. Dr. Doan explains what occurred when they reunited.

“When we finally reunited for good, it was awesome, but also very difficult. We had all grown so much that rekindling that relationship again was difficult,” Dr. Doan said.

What made everything fall back into place though was the solid foundation of love her parents put in place.

Dr. Janice Doan with her family at a younger age.

“Having such a strong foundation of love really helped us through everything. Being able to build on that foundation even more made it all worth it,” Dr. Doan said.

Getting started in dentistry

Her family was even the spark that lit Dr. Doan’s passion for dentistry, stemming from her sister’s education to her own summer volunteer work.

Dr. Doan first became interested in dentistry when she visited her sister while she was enrolled at the University of Southern California School of Dentistry.

Through these frequent visits, Dr. Doan watched her sister learn about dentistry through lab and clinical work. Dr. Doan was inspired meeting some of her sister’s professors and peers.

The Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC hosts the annual Dental Explorers two-week camp.

Additionally, Dr. Doan took part in a summer program called “The Dental Explorers”. The two-week summer camp hosted by the University of Southern California helped Dr. Doan fall in love with dentistry even more.

“I enjoyed the summer camp so much that right after I finished dental school, I became the director for the Dental Explorers Program and taught the summer class,” Dr. Doan said.

What’s happening now?

To no surprise, both themes of family and dentistry continue to be central in Dr. Doan’s life. Her family’s practice, A+ Family Dentistry, keeps improving and expanding.

Dr. Doan said the goal of the family practice is not success but rather accessibility.

“We want to help people, not just in Poway and San Diego, but everywhere. The way to do this was to open another office in Sorrento Valley to help the people there,” Dr. Janice Doan said.

Extending a helping hand

The challening journey to humanitarianism

Tristan Hamilton, DDS, M. Arch.

Apart from being both a dentist and an architect, Dr. Tristan Hamilton is also an avid humanitarian. From his first medical mission in Western Zambia to his current clinic in Grenada, mission work has always been a staple in Dr. Hamilton’s life.

After spending some time in Western Africa, Dr. Hamilton said he knew that mission work was his passion. This ultimately led him to create the Church Street Clinic in the city of St. George’s on the island of Grenada.

Dr. Hamilton said Grenada proved to be one of the more difficult places that he has done mission work in, mostly due to their strict regulations.

Dr. Tristan Hamilton during some of his early mission work.

“I’ve been all over the world doing mission work and doing every aspect of mission work; whether I’m building a facility, using my hands to do construction, or whether or not I’m doing medical or dental work. It’s never been difficult to actually do good, except in Grenada,” Dr. Hamilton said.

Dr. Hamilton was fully expecting to see patients when he first arrived in Grenada, but a quick call from the liaison in the United States changed all of that.

Instead of being able to sit down and care for the patients in Grenada, Dr. Hamilton said he spent his first day scrambling around to try and get his dental license passed by the Grenada Medical and Dental Council.  

“I spent a whole entire day visiting four different government offices, and at the end of the day, they only qualified me to be able to do sealants,” Dr. Hamilton said.

Dr. Tristan Hamilton with his family in Grenada.

Although being approved to do sealants may not seem like that big of a deal, Dr. Hamilton counted this as a huge victory and even said he learned some other lessons from that challenging, hectic day.

“That day made me aware of a lot of things, like how patients are a great virtue to have,” Dr. Hamilton said.

Overcoming other hardships

Construction barriers

Dr. Hamilton still had some hurdles to get over once his license was approved in Grenada. Construction in third-world countries is not always the easiest, and Dr. Hamilton said the builders had to get creative sometimes.

“We were inspecting the office and got down into the basement where I inspected the suction and the compressor. I walked right outside to see that the drain hose from the hi-vac suction was sticking out of the window of the basement and into the gutter of the stree. Totally normal, right?” Dr. Hamilton said.

The difference in something as simple as what materials were being used really blew Dr. Hamilton away.

Even though some of the projects had to be redone, both the builders and Dr. Hamilton were able to work together to get the clinic up and running.  

 Being in two places at once

While doing work at the Church Street Clinic, Dr. Hamilton soon realized that his consistency would make the biggest impact on the community. This was a hard pill to swallow because his original plans did not include him being in Grenada full-time.

Dr. Hamilton assessing the inventory at the Church Street Clinic.

“My vision for the Church Street Clinic was that I’d go down a few times a year and spend a couple of weeks serving the people of that area, but then I asked myself, what happens in the mean time?”

Dr. Hamilton soon became concerned about what would happen to the patients who needed a dentist when he wasn’t readily in the country. It was hard for him to accept the fact that he wouldn’t be the ultimate cure-all for the St. George’s community.

Thankfully, Dr. Hamilton was able to find a solution to this problem with the help of Dr. Noel. Dr. Noel will act as the boots on the ground year round, catering to those patients in need when Dr. Hamilton isn’t around.

“Now we have somebody that’s in place and that’s really committed to giving back to her people. Now we have that consistency within our clinic’s setting to provide the greatest impact to the community.” Dr. Hamilton said.

Apart from Dr. Noel, there are two other volunteers who help out at the clinic. Dr. Hamilton is even in the process of hiring a dental hygienist to work at the clinic that would act as another constant presence for the community.

Why it’s all worth it

Though the process of creating and working in the Church Street Clinic were troubling and difficult, Dr. Hamilton said he persevered for all of the moments that fill his heart with joy.  It’s not just about the dental work Dr. Hamilton does for his patients, but about going that extra mile and showing his patients that he cares.

“Once they know that you care, you become more than just some outsider who’s there for a two-week fix,” Dr Hamilton said.

Dr. Hamilton said going above and beyond with his patients has always proven to make the greatest impact above all.

Dr. Tristan Hamilton (center) during his mission work.

His mission work has taught him that he’ll never know what’s about to walk through the door, just that he has to be prepared to try and offer the best care that he possibly can. “My take home was that I need to provide a quality of care no matter what I encounter,” Dr. Hamilton said.

One patient that’s close to Dr. Hamilton’s heart is a man who had a mass removed from the right side of his face. Dr. Hamilton knew that this patient was in a dire situation, since the five-centimeter mass blocked his right eye and went down towards his jaw.

The patient’s reaction after the procedure is one that Dr. Hamilton will remember for the rest of his life.

“His first comment was, ‘Now I can get a girlfriend because I don’t have this mass on my face!’” Dr. Hamilton said.

Future Plans

As Dr. Hamilton continues to improve the clinic, he’s also aiming to expand his reach to the other surrounding islands. “There’s a couple of different islands within the chain, such as Carriacou , that we’re eventually trying to get to with a mobile dental unit in order to serve some of the people who have a harder time getting to Grenada to be treated.”

Even though majority of the clinic’s patients come from Grenada, Dr. Hamilton wants to be able to extend his treatment and care to all of those who need it.

Dr. Hamilton with a child during his mission work.

Dr. Hamilton plans on traveling down to the Church Street Clinic this upcoming September. He has certain goals to achieve for the clinic and hopes to see a lot of progress get made. Even though the clinic is functioning, Dr. Hamilton realizes that improvements can and always will always be made.  

Supporting the clinic

Those interested in supporting the Church Street Clinic can do so directly on the clinic’s Facebook page. The Church Street Clinic team accepts all donations including things like thoughts, prayers, monetary donations and even instruments and supplies.

Want to volunteer?

Don’t worry about a lack of dental knowledge or experience.

Volunteers can take on a variety of roles, including ones where they act as additional support.

Dr. Hamilton realizes that oftentimes it’s the extra help and support that makes the biggest difference in mission work such as the Church Street Clinic.