From HGTV straight to your dental practice!

If you can’t get enough of the amazing creations of Fixer Upper stars Chip and Joanna Gaines (shown) think about incorporating one of the stylish wall coverings from Joanna’s Magnolia Home Collection into your dental practice. Available through CenterPoint Design at Benco Dental, these unique designs are distributed by Momentum Textiles & Wallcovering

Shown above, a dental operatory at Benco Dental’s CenterPoint East showroom that features stylish wall covering Avenue WC, from Joanna’s Magnolia Home Collection as distributed by Momentum Textiles & Wallcovering.

“We at Centerpoint Design choose to use wallcovering in many different areas, for many different reasons,”  says Megan Chuzas, Interior Designer at Benco Dental’s CenterPoint Design.

“A larger scale pattern can be used to draw attention to a well-lighted logo wall.  In restrooms, wall covering is often a code requirement in order to help with infection control and clean-ability.  In high-traffic areas, wall covering is used to provide added wall protection.” 

Megan Chuzas, Interior Designer with Benco Dental’s CenterPoint Design group.

Known for her modern farmhouse style, Joanna Gaines incorporates classic designs in her collection, staying true to her brand, while still making them feel current and on trend. Many of her designs are subtle enough to be used throughout an entire space. While others that are larger in scale or made of natural materials, are more well-suited for accent areas or a feature wall. 

Stylish wall covering styles from Joanna’s Magnolia Home Collection and available through CenterPoint Design at Benco Dental, distributed by Momentum Textiles & Wallcovering.

Welcoming and comfortable with a dash of charm, classic farmhouse style is more popular than ever thanks to shows like HGTV’s Fixer Upper. In response to the minimalist trend that was popular in the 1990s and early 2000s, people are now embracing the tradition and surrounding themselves in an environment that makes them feel right at home.

“There are a number of other creative ways to incorporate wall covering into your office design.  Work with a Centerpoint Designer to find out how,” adds Megan Chuzas, CenterPoint Interior Designer at Benco Dental.

Want to add Joanna Gaines’ wall coverings into your dental practice?

Call 1.800.GOBENCO today.

Ready to Design the Future?

The 2020 Incisal Edge Design Competition, for a seventh straight year, aims to reward creativity and innovation in dental practice design. This year’s challenge for visionaries everywhere: Big Design Statement, Small Space in the Incisal Edge Design of the Future category.

Who can enter?

Students, architects, interior designers, dentists, anyone with the vision to create a workplace for the dental patients and practitioners of tomorrow are invited to enter by Incisal Edge, the country’s premier dental lifestyle magazine.

What can you win?

One grand prize winner will receive:

  • $2,000 prize
  • an “Incisal Edge Design of the Future Winner” seal to be used in a portfolio
  • a profile in Incisal Edge dental lifestyle magazine’s spring 2020 issue

Second prize winners will receive:

  • $1000 prize

Learn more about Design of the Future contest details

Select Design of the Future and complete the corresponding nomination form at IEDesignContest.com

Entries will be accepted through November 29, 2019 for Design of the Future category. A juried panel of experts from the dental and architectural worlds will pick the most striking designs.

Read about the 2019 award winners, including RiNo dental, created by Alexis Wilson here.

A 2017 Syracuse University graduate, Alexis Wilson was interested in ways to help people combat their fear of the dentist. She got intrigued by “forest bathing,” a concept—especially popular in Japan—“where you’re just in the forest, absorbing the atmosphere,” Wilson told Incisal Edge. “I had the idea to create a nature-inspired interior but add some personality as well.” Her design for RiNo Dental, shown above, earned the 2019 Design of the Future grand prize in the Incisal Edge Design Competition.

Ready to enter? Get started.

http://www.iedesigncontest.com/2020-entry-forms/

For complete contest terms and conditions visit: https://www.benco.com/contest-instructions/

Clowning around to provide free oral care for kids in AZ

Dr. Brianna Hillier partners with Ronald McDonald to provide free oral care for kids in out-of-the-way southern Arizona.

The Director of Dental Services at Chiricahua Community Health Center helps the people of Cochise County by offering oral care to all regardless of ability to pay. Through its partnership with Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern Arizona, it’s able to redouble its efforts for pediatric patients. Dr. Hillier shares the story with Incisal Edge dental lifestyle magazine:

“When the Chiricahua Community Health Center’s Molar Patroller couldn’t take its services on the road any longer, the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile pulled up to save the day. The community health center and the famed burger clown’s eponymous charity house, you see, are now partnering to provide free oral-health care to children in Cochise County, a rural outpost in far southeastern Arizona.”

Reports Rebecca Chieffallo, Incisal Edge
Dental assistant Denise Godoy welcomes a new young patient to the mobile clinic.

According to the story, CCHCI’s dentists work out of the Care Mobile, a dental office that travels to schools and communities throughout the immense county, which is roughly the size of Rhode Island and Connecticut combined. CCHCI’s own delightfully named Molar Patroller operated for a decade until 2014, when the group determined the vehicle had become outdated. Patients, Dr. Hillier reports, can’t wait to see the new ride.

“[Parents] would come in for checkups and say they really missed seeing us out at the schools, and the kids did as well. When they heard we were coming back, they were very excited.”

Dr. Brianna Hillier, Director of Dental Services at Chiricahua Community Health Center

Read the full interview and learn how you can help: https://www.incisaledgemagazine.com/mag/article/clowning-around/

Headed to San Fran for the ADA FDI World Dental Congress? Mark Wahlberg is too.

On Thursday, Oscar-nominated actor and producer Mark Wahlberg will serve as keynote speaker of the ADA FDI 2019 Opening Ceremony and General Session. The Mark Wahlberg Youth Foundation, which he founded in 2001, travels across the U.S. to create a dialogue around the dangers of opioid abuse.

“Wahlberg’s long-standing allegiance to philanthropic outreach and the Foundation’s efforts to address opioid abuse align with the work of ADA and dentists across the country. Join us during the Opening Ceremony and General Session to hear more about this important work and to recognize and celebrate the extraordinary global impact that ADA and FDI dentists make every day.”

WorldDentalCongress.org

Wahlberg, a committed philanthropist, works to improve the quality of life for inner-city youth through the Foundation, helping them to be successful and lead extraordinary lives.

Who else will inspire attendees?

Alison Levine, team captain of the first American Women’s Everest Expedition and author of the New York Times Bestseller, On the Edge: Leadership Lessons from Everest and Other Extreme Environments, will present Thursday at 1:30 p.m. and offer a small group session – a Fireside Chat at 3:30 p.m.


Her goal: to inspire attendees to reach new heights and discover how the principles that lead to success in the world of extreme adventure also apply to the everyday settings—in a dental practice and in life. Levine will share authentic parallels between the mountains and the uncontrollable events that you deal with every day. Set against the backdrop of her remarkable expeditions, she will provide a framework to help you scale the ‘big peaks’ you aspire to climb and offer unorthodox advice about how to take risk, improve teamwork and deal with changing environments.

Haven’t registered yet? There’s still time. Find out how below.

Register here.

For the full preliminary schedule, visit the main General Information page. Event registration is completed through the online registration process. For education events, visit the Continuing Education pages.

Women in dentistry: Learn to live your strengths with DeWLife

With every issue of their lifestyle magazine for women in dentistry, DeW Life (Dental entrepreneur Women) aims to inspire. In November, they’ll take that mission beyond the pages of the magazine to Charlotte, North Carolina as hosts of their inaugural retreat.

“We want to fill a void that exists regarding female leaders and inspirational voices. To show young ladies entering the profession that the opportunities are real. To encourage those already digging in to raise their voices and for those seasoned veterans to give back and refuse to quit…” is the credo prominently displayed on their website.

Opening the event on November 14 and 15 at the Providence Country Club: Learning to Live Your Strengths, with presenters from Strengths Savvy, an inspirational journey from Connie Dugan and a welcome from Chief DeW-er Anne M. Duffy, RDH.

“Bossy little girls become strong leaders. My dad used to lovingly call me a pushy broad. My grandmother lovingly noted that I was very loud, and my brother was grateful when I tried to chase the bullies away from him. To this day I will ask for raises for my co-workers if I think they are deserving. It came as no surprise that when I realized women in dentistry were not getting their due, not getting paid the same, not getting the keynotes, not getting the respect they deserve, being bullied and /or harassed at work, (need I go on?) that I would do what I could to change that. Yes, the birth of DeW Life was in my DNA.”

Editor and Publisher Anne M. Duffy, RDH

Don’t miss this lineup of experts

Guest speakers at the inaugural event will include:

Dr. Shakila Angadi, The Inspired Dentist (shown) will be among guest speakers at the DeW 2019 Retreat.

Do good while you’re there

Throughout the retreat, DeW Life will host raffles to benefit Brown Girl and Oral Cancer Cause .

Want to register? Here’s how.

https://mailchi.mp/dew.life/dewretreat2019

Balance your body and mind at #LHP19 with Anelody Tice

Dentistry takes its toll on the body. If an expert offered to help your body restore its physical, emotional, mental and physiological balance and retain it through movement, touch and music, would you try it?

Anelody Tice grew up studying ballet. From the age of 5, she enjoyed the movement and creativity of dance. As an adult she found the same passion with Yoga and Pilates and continued to learn about the body while studying Massage, Craniosacral and Visceral Therapy. The past 15 years have brought her to culminate experiences and skills into an integrated approach to help people seeking health.

She’ll share her unique take on therapeutic movement this fall at an event that celebrates women in dentistry.

Anelody Tice, LMP, CCST will lead a session in this powerful #GyroKinetic way of working out. She’ll share easy home exercises to keep you energized, strong and balanced at the 7th annual Lucy Hobbs Project Celebration on October 3-5 The Blackstone in Chicago.

Join her and 9 more incredible speakers, earn 4 CE credits & celebrate women in dentistry at this event with the theme Mind+Body+Soul! Register: https://www.regmadeeasy.com/be…/the-lucy-hobbs-project/2019/

Want to register and attend?

Learn more about this incredible event: https://us.dental-tribune.com/c/benco-dental-company-usa/news/https-us-dental-tribune-com-login-logged_outtrue/

Earn 4 CE credits and celebrate women in dentistry! Register: https://www.regmadeeasy.com/be…/the-lucy-hobbs-project/2019/

The Lucy Hobbs Way

While we generally profile great women from dentistry’s past, we do not want to neglect any woman of the past who has advanced the cause of equality for women and the advancement of society in general. On the run-up to the 100th anniversary of American women getting the vote (women were enfranchised via the 19th amendment on August 26, 1920) we are profiling a woman who worked tirelessly for others in the medical field as a nurse and also championed women’s right to vote – Mary Bartlett Dixon Cullen. She displayed the tenacity and persistence, along with the will to make things better, that we at Benco Dental and the entire Lucy Hobbs Project hope to support in today’s women dentists.

Mary-Bartlett_Dixon_Photo - Newspapers.com
Photo from The Baltimore Evening Sun, August 14, 1912.

Mary was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1873. Her father, William T. Dixon, was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University Hospital before becoming President of the hospital; he also owned the Dixon-Bartlett Company and was president of the National Exchange Bank. Mary Bartlett Dixon was admitted to the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, as many other young women were starting to do, as the Civil War had opened that career up for females.

At the time of her enrollment, the student nurses worked longer hours than the Principal of the School of Nursing, Adelaide Nutting, thought they should. She figured with the President of the university’s daughter enrolled, he would see and hopefully, reduce, the number of hours the nurses toiled. This strategy worked, and Mr. Dixon reduced the hours, however; Miss Dixon worked twice as hard as her peers and graduated in 1903.

No Longer Neutral

As she started working, Mary chafed at the neutral stance nurses were expected to exhibit in the face of political inequality. At one point, she wrote a letter to the editor of the American Journal of Nurses criticizing the journal’s neutral position on women’s suffrage. She rapidly realized that one could not separate women’s health with women’s rights – they were undeniably linked. How could you improve people’s health if you couldn’t improve their lot politically? In October 1908, Dixon published an essay titled “Votes for Women” in the Nurses’ Journal of the Pacific Coast. Dixon asserted, “no other issue or matter could be attended to until nurses were politically oriented.” She urged nurses to find out the voting laws in each state, as some states (particularly in the West) allowed women to vote in local elections, although by the early 1900s, if a state had allowed women to vote in certain elections, they might have revoked such rights and no woman could vote in a national election. Most states had some combination of rules that allowed almost any one, (sometimes they needed to own property) over the age of 21 and who lived in a community for one year to be eligible to vote ‘except women, children, idiots, and criminals,” Mary found.

Pushing Ahead

By October 1909, Mary was the chairman of the Woman’s Suffrage Association of Maryland, compiling a pamphlet championing the cause of women to vote. Along with working tirelessly for suffrage, she continued her nursing. She worried that there was no nursing school or hospital in Easton, the seat of Talbot County, Maryland.  In 1907, she and Elizabeth Wright set up a school of nursing with no money – it was all staffed by volunteers. The school eventually became the MacQueen Gibbs Willis School of Nursing and then part of the Allied Health program at Chesapeake College. She was also the founder of the Talbot County Children’s Aid Society.

Not Afraid to Suffer for the Cause

Mary_Bartlett_Dixon_groupphoto
Caption: “Some of the picket line of Nov. 10, 1917.” Left to right: Mrs. Catherine Martinette, Eagle Grove, Iowa. Mrs. William Kent, Kentfield, California. Miss Mary Bartlett Dixon, Easton, Md. Mrs. C.T. Robertson, Salt Lake City, Utah. Miss Cora Week, New York City. Miss Amy Ju[e]ngling, Buffalo, N.Y. Miss Hattie Kruger, Buffalo, N.Y. Miss Belle Sheinberg, N.Y.C. Miss Julia Emory, Baltimore, Md.

Credit: Photograph by Harris & Ewing, Washington, D.C., November 10, 1917. Cropped version of the photograph published in The Suffragist 5, no. 95 (Nov. 17, 1917). Available from the Library of Congress, National Woman’s Party Records, Group II, Container II:276, Folder: Group Photographs Nos. 77-87, and online at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/mnwp.276023.

A few years later the issue of women’s suffrage was facing several important votes. A portion of the suffrage movement known as the National Woman’s Party led by suffragist Alice Paul became the first “cause” to picket outside the White House. The ladies marched with signs and held mostly peaceful protests. In March 1913, Woodrow Wilson received the first suffragists in the White House—led by Alice Paul, and including Mary Bartlett Dixon and three others. Because state level suffrage was met with great resistance, suffragists like Dixon knew that a constitutional amendment was the only way to gain equality everywhere. On November 10, 1917, Dixon posed with a group of women protestors for a photograph including the suffrage banner and a critique of President Wilson. That day, Dixon was arrested for picketing the White House. She was sent to the Occoquan Workhouse along with many other suffragists.

Unstoppable

Mary_Bartlett_Dixon_float - Newspapers.com
Image of Mary Bartlett Dixon on a float in front of the Talbot County Courthouse, circa 1911-1912. The Easton Star Democrat, April 5, 2018.

This stint in the workhouse apparently did not stop Mary from continuing her quest for universal suffrage. She went back to Maryland and continued the fight.

Gaining the Vote

Mary Bartlett Dixon was married shortly before she gained the right to vote. She married Dr. Thomas S. Cullen, a gynecologist at Johns Hopkins, in a small ceremony surrounded by family on April 6, 1920.

Last Accolades

In 1949 the Board of the Memorial Hospital of Easton decided to name establish a new fund in Mary’s name, the Mary Bartlett Dixon Cullen fund for Nursing Education.

After her husband died in 1953, she donated her Baltimore home to the American Cancer Society.

A Quaker, she was a member of the Friends Meeting in Easton, Maryland. Mary Bartlett Dixon Cullen died on September 6, 1957, at her home, Moreling Chance, near Easton. She was buried in Spring Hill Cemetery, in Easton, Talbot County, Maryland.

For more information on the unsung life of Mary Bartlett Dixon, see this biographical sketch here.

For more information on the Benco Dental Lucy Hobbs Project, supporting women in dentistry, click here.

IMG_7400
Some modern-day suffragettes, displaying their colors at a vintage event.

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

Practically Painless Dentistry?

A group of dentists working together in a central location and offering all sorts of dental procedures, painlessly – that’s a modern invention, right? Wrong! Back at the turn of the last century, there were several dental groups that advertised “Painless Dentistry”.

False Advertising

Painless_dentist_SpokaneChronicleWash_oct21_1904 - Newspapers.co

How painless were they? It’s hard to determine that now, but several made that claim. The first outfit I came across that advertised “…teeth extracted, filled or crowned without pain…” was the Boston Painless Dentists (shown at left), advertising, not in Boston, but way out in Seattle, Portland, and Tacoma in 1904. My first thought was that they were probably using cocaine, or some other now-banned drug to help with the pain. They did not reveal their pain-relief methods.

Then there was the Chicago Painless Dentists (shown below), again, not practicing in Chicago, but in Portland, Oregon. They claimed to extract teeth, “…WITHOUT PAIN. Nothing inhaled – no gas, no chloroform or ether – and above all, no cocaine…” That sounds good, doesn’t it? Possibly better than the Boston Painless Dentists.

A Fairy Tale You Say?

Moving East toward the middle of the United States, we run into the New York Painless Dentists (shown below). Why are all these groups of dentists named for Eastern towns? I don’t know; possibly because it made them sound more professional, being from “back East”. They apparently operated out of the Kansas area, although they also claimed to have offices in Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin.

FtScottDailyTribuneKansas6/14/1911 - Newspapers.com
Ft. Scott Daily Tribune, Ft. Scott, Kansas, June 14, 1911.

Again, they do not state what they do (or don’t do) that makes their dentistry painless, so we can only guess. If you read the testimonials, they apparently had many satisfied customers. If they used some mixture of alcohol or cocaine, I’m not surprised they had happy customers (and pain-free procedures!

Painless Romine — Man of Mystery

Painless Dentist Oshkosh Northwestern, Wisconson, 7/2/1910 - New
The Menasha Record, Wisconsin, April 18, 1910.

One other dental group I identified in newspaper ads placed during the turn of the century was practicing painless dentistry in the Midwest — the Union Painless Dentists, fronted by a dentist by the name of Romine (sometimes misspelled “Romaine”). In the advertisements (one shown above), he is sometimes referred to as the Manager of the Union Painless Dentists.

While he may have started off as a real person, he eventually becomes a figurehead for the Union Painless Dentists. He is at first referred to as S.A. Romine, M.D.H.D, D.D.S., but after a few years, the advertisements I found simply refer to him as “Painless Romine”. I could not find any information regarding his dental degree, schooling, or town of origin. He claimed to make dentistry painless by way of drugs he had developed: Anzone, Man-No-Pain and Nox-U. Needless to say, the ads list no ingredients. They claim exclusivity to Union Painless Dentists and Dr. Romine.

Post_Crescent_AppletonWisc_June4_1910 - Newspapers.com
The Post Crescent, Appleton, Wisconsin, June 4, 1910.

Setting Up Shop

The method for the Union Painless Dentists and various other dental groups, was to create a permanent office in one town, then travel to surrounding towns and set up shop in local hotels. The dentists would advertise to the public that they were available to treat patients for a limited time in the temporary location.

Painless_Dentist_ad_LeotiStandard_Kansas_Jan12_1905 - Newspapers
Leoti Standard, Kansas, January 12, 1905.

It appears “Painless Romine” and the Union Painless Dentists continued until the early 1920s, or at least after that period ads were no longer in newspapers. By the 1920s, the Union Painless Dentists group was referred to as the Union Dental Company and they advertised “practically painless” dentistry, not completely painless dentistry. Perhaps their remedies weren’t so effective, after all.

“Painless Romine” had the last laugh, though, as this little newspaper blurb states.

Painless_Dentistry_SalinaKS_March 19_1920 - Newspapers.com
The Salina Daily Union, Kansas, March 19, 1920.

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

Dentists: Let’s celebrate #NationalTellAJokeDay

Jokes are one of the most classic ice breakers, mood lifters, and laugh inducers of all time – especially in the dental office.

So, it’s not a surprise that jokes have their own national day dedicated to all of the joy and giggles they bring about.

August 16th is National Tell a Joke Day, and it’s time to celebrate.

Jokes can be used in virtually any situation, considering there are infinite jokes about infinite things that relate to infinite situations, including dentistry.

Jokes can be the perfect antidote for nervous patients who may not enjoy trips to the dentist.

By lightening the mood and lessening the tension, telling simple, funny dental jokes may be the perfect way to ensure that all patients have enjoyable and low-stress visits.

Here are a few jokes to entertain any patient in your dental office:

  • What did the judge say to the dentist?
    Do you swear to pull the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth?
  • What do you call a dentist’s advice?
    His “fl-ossophy”
  • What does a member of the marching band use to brush his teeth?
    A tuba toothpaste
  • What’s a dentist’s favorite time of day?
    Tooth-thirty
  • What will a dentist give you for one dollar?
    Buck teeth
  • What’s a dentist’s favorite dance move?
    The floss

Additional benefits

Apart from making dentist visits more enjoyable for some patients, jokes also offer several other benefits related to laughter, such as:

  • Health benefits:
    • Increases production of infection fighting antibodies
    • Improves blood circulation
    • Increases production of endorphins
    •  Reduces stress
    • Soothes tension

Make sure to celebrate #NationalTellAJokeDay and make someone laugh! Let us know your favorite dentistry jokes if we missed them, too!

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron on how struggles lead to success #IE40Under40

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron, DMD, has been recognized as one of America’s Best Young Dentists, the 2019 Incisal Edge 40 Under 40 honorees.

Dr. Salmeron with Benco Dental Chairman and Customer Advocate Larry Cohen (left) at this year’s 40 Under 40 event in NYC.

This accomplishment, along with many other great feats, such as graduating from the top of her class at Case Western Reserve School of Dental Medicine (while also waiting tables at her local diner) and starting a new dental practice, Edge Endodontics in Austin, Texas, makes it clear that Dr. Salmeron is equipped with a ferocious and undying drive to succeed.

The Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine in Clevelang, Ohio.

Just as everyone faces difficult times, Dr. Salermon had struggles of her own to overcome while trying to pave the path for a career in dentistry.

Dr. Yuliya looked her troubles straight in the eye and came barreling at them, determined to overcome all of the odds pinned against her.

This determination and endless perseverance is the reason Dr. Yuliya Salmeron is where she is today.

Hardships growing up

Coming to the United States from Russia as a child, Dr. Yuliya had a bit more to work through than the average child.

The key to her success? Constantly staying positive. Her good attitude is responsible for all that she has and will continue to accomplish.

“I was hungry for a better life. My family was still in Russia, and I wanted to help them tremendously. Honestly, I had no time to be negative.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

This survival instinct sparked a fire in Dr. Salmeron, and she knew that she would stop at nothing to bring her family the life they deserve.

Despite this unwavering determination, Dr. Salmeron still admits that there were a few moments of fear and stress that made her question the achievability of her goals.

“The fear of failure came over me several times when I was going through college in my twenties; it caused a lot of stress.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

Overcoming the struggles

By remembering all that she had on the line – both in her family life and professional life – Dr. Salmeron learned to overcome the stress and not let it bother her, no matter how intense things seemed to get.

“Without the safety net of my parents to back me up, I stopped doubting myself and realized that the only way I could go was forward.”

Soaking up the family time

Today, Dr. Salmeron soaks up every minute of family time she is blessed with.

Dr. Salmeron’s two sons visit her at her practice, Edge Endodontics in Austin, Texas.

“One of the best parts about my family life is being with my boys and watching them grow. They are incredibly smart, and sometimes the best memories are made doing something as simple as watching cartoons with them,” Dr. Salmeron said.

Prioritizing her practice

Apart from her family life, Dr. Salmeron also enjoys making memories in her professional career.  She aims to make a difference in her patients’ lives every day.

Dr. Salmeron’s practice, Edge Endodontics in Austin, Texas.

“As an endodontist, I try to save my patients’ natural teeth, so seeing them right away is critical when they are in pain.  I aim to create a relaxing, almost spa-like experience when I perform procedures that alleviate any discomfort they might be having.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron

Future Plans for her Practice

In the future, Dr. Salmeron plans to continue building upon her professional successes. Since her practice, Edge Endodontics, has only been up and running for a little over eight months, Dr. Salmeron recognizes that there’s still a lot of work to do.

“My goals include things like providing infinite support to my fellow dentists, as well as offering immediate appointments for emergency cases to relieve my patients’ pain,” Dr. Salmeron said.

Juggling it all

With running a new practice comes its own difficulties. Dr. Salmeron recognizes that there are still some roadblocks ahead, especially as a single parent in the field of dentistry.

“Juggling motherhood, personal relationships and my professional career is sometimes exhausting and very challenging,” Dr. Salmeron said. “Most people say it’s important to find a balance, but I don’t think there is one.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron, DMD.

Dr. Salmeron realizes that it’s impossible to do all things well. Some days are more centered around her practice and other days around her kids. In the end, she has to remind herself of the sacrifices she’s making to ensure her kids have a good, solid future ahead of them.

Her advice to other doctors

In the end, Dr. Salmeron urges all others in similar situations to remind themselves that working hard doesn’t make you a bad mother, partner, friend, or anything along the lines.

Dr. Salmeron is looking forward to the challenges her future career will hold. The bigger the challenge, the better-suited doctor she will become.

“Opposition is good. Just as lifting heavier weights in the gym builds a stronger muscle, facing a harder challenge builds a better professional.”

Dr. Yuliya Salmeron