Chilly temps and even cooler dental innovations

The nation’s largest family-owned dental distributor strives to make it simple to stay up to date with the latest equipment and technology. 

Benco Dental is driving dentistry forward with the newest and coolest technology doctors need in the form of its Six Neat Things promotion.

Z-Vac cleans and deodorizes systems and equipment.

While it’s cleaning and deodorizing, the Benco Brands Z-Vac concentrated Evacuation System Cleaner offers a neutral pH and leaves equipment smelling great with a fresh lemon fragrance. 

The Z-Vac Concentrated Evacuation System Cleaner from Benco Dental.

Used for cleaning and deodorizing systems and equipment, Z-Vac is compatible with amalgam separators and dissolves and destroys a wide range of dental debris. 

Among Z-Vac benefits: 

  • Non-foaming 
  • Biodegradable 
  • Premeasured bottle 

For more information on Benco Brands’ Z-Vac, click here.

Offer your patients affordable dentures with Nuvoflex’s Easy Denture 

With over 60 million people in the United States living life without even a single tooth in their mouth, Easy Denture can help provide full and bright smiles. 

Nuvoflex Easy Denture.

Once Easy Denture is in the patient’s hands, all he or she needs to do is follow simple steps: 

  • Place the denture in boiling water for 60 seconds 
  • Allow it to cool for 60 seconds
  • Fit it to the mouth shape
  • Create a tight suction by closing mouth and using a thumb to press against the top of the denture while sucking in.

Easy Denture costs a few hundreds of dollars in comparison to thousands of dollars for traditional dentures. 

Click here for more information on Nuvoflex’s Easy Denture.

Healthier gums? Look to Oral B GENIUS X Professional Exclusive and Oral B App

With the inclusion of Artificial Intelligence, the new Oral B GENIUS X provides real-time feedback to ensure best results from brushing.

Accessories offered with Oral B’s GENIUS X.

The power brush comes equipped with a timer to ensure that teeth are being brushed for a full two minutes as opposed to the 30-60 seconds that people brush on average.

GENIUS X benefits: 

  • Triple pressure control 
    • Reinforces gentle brushing 
  • Position detection 
    • Allows every zone to be targeted 
  • Customizable options with up to 12 different colors.

For more information on the Oral B GENIUS X, click here.

Enhance the protection, comfort of patients and staff with Provision New Safety Eyewear. 

The latest protective eyewear from Palmero offers everything from full-face shields and goggles to laser safety and bonding glasses. Every product offers comfort and affordability. 

Goggles offered in Palmero’s Provision New Safety Eyewear.

The Palmero Provision New Eyewear meets the 4 Cs of Safety Eyewear:

  • Certified – meets industry standards 
  • Clarity – high excellent optics with anti-fog and scratch resistance 
  • Comfort – ranges of frames, temple and nose bridge options to make the best fit 
  • Compliance – providing safety eyewear for everyone every day

Learn more about Palmero’s Provision New Safety Eyewear here.

Stay up to date with LED technology and Spring Health Product’s The CURE.

The CURE is the smallest, most powerful and durable LED curing light; now it features a wider lens. 

The CURE from Spring Health Products.

The LED has four diodes in the tip to provide a six-second cure at a wavelength capable of polymerizing most light-cured dental materials, even through porcelain. 

The CURE benefits: 

  • Lightweight (1.7 oz)
  • Slim, ergonomic design 
  • Durable, scratch resistant 
  • 11 mm lens
  • Easy disinfection 

The flat-back head and low-profile design ensure easy access to all areas of the mouth and the front and back power buttons allow for easy operations.

For more information on Spring Health Product’s The CURE, click here.

Use the Voco Traypurol Tabs to clean impression trays, instruments and more. 

Voco Traypurol tabs are simple to dose and use. Unlike traditional cleaning powders, the tabs automatically and completely dissolve in water. 

The Traypurol Tabs from Voco.

The Voco Traypurol Tabs:

  • Dissolve alginates and cements in a short amount of time
  • Are bio-degradable and pH-neutral 
  • Use gentle material – suitable for all rustproof metals and plastics

The solution is effective for up to 72 hours and doesn’t require the use of an ultrasonic cleaner. 

Click here to learn more about the Voco Traypurol Tabs.

Where can you get smiles like these? Try Pittsburgh. #countdowntoHalloween

If you want to see some transformational teeth, Jordan Patton suggests any number of the mutation scenes in John Carpenter’s The Thing.  

“The majority of those creatures just had such interesting anatomy choices, it’s hard to pick a favorite. Another great one is the transformation scene in American Werewolf in London! There were so many different dentures used through each stage of the transformation each one getting more and more intense.”

Jordan Patton, Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program Instructor at Douglas Education Center

If Patton sounds like he’s got insight on the subject, it’s not just because those Rick Baker creations are among his favorite dentition-related scenes in film. The artist dedicates his talents as a Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program Instructor at Douglas Education Center, just outside of Pittstburgh, Pennsylvania.

Jordan Patton during a painting demo for a graduation class portfolio at Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program before he became an instructor at the school.

Realism is vital in these projects, says Patton, who in 2018 was featured on SYFY’s FaceOff, a competition/elimination series in which special effects make-up artists participate in elaborate challenges for a grand prize and the honor of being Hollywood’s next great effects artist.

“Some of the biggest challenges to achieving a realistic look comes from subtle detailing that most wouldn’t think to pay attention to. If you want to achieve realism, you have to replicate every little detail to create the illusion of life inside your piece, down to broken capillaries, veining, pores, body hair, gloss finish versus matte finish.”

Jordan Patton, Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program Instructor at Douglas Education Center

The freelance sculptor, mask maker, and special effects artist explains some of the curriculum at the school. Before students begin working on major projects, they learn the fundamentals of anatomy.

“We start with a basic human anatomy class. We also stress the importance of anatomy in all of our base sculpture courses, as well as all of our prosthetic makeup classes, because anatomical knowledge is one of the main keys to being able to create a believable makeup.”

Photos courtesy Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program at Douglas Education Center.

Like Patton, graduates of Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program Instructor at Douglas Education Center move on to successful careers, some where the teeth aren’t designed to, well, terrify. Like dental labs.

“Our first introduction to dental labs as a viable employment option for special makeup effects graduates occurred when many years ago one of our graduates obtained a job in a local dental lab. This graduate realized that the skills he learned at DEC could be applied in a different industry and he was very excited to share that revelation with the Career Services office. By engaging with current students via Mock Interviews and classroom presentations, we were able to present a different career path option to upcoming graduates.”

Dana Melvin, Career Services Department at Douglas Education Center

“In addition to dental labs, our graduates move on to develop successful careers in the film industry, theaters, special effects and prop-making shops, medical prosthetics labs, theme parks, set design, toy making, professional makeup artistry, and much more.

Amanda Smith, a graduate of Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program Instructor works today as a CAD CAM Production Manager at a dental lab in Pittsburgh. Seven years ago, she was hired for her artistic ability. Here she explains her role.

Back at the school, Patton shares some of the techniques that help students advance in their fields.

“Here we teach a digital sculpting program called Z-Brush that gives the students an introduction into the 3D modeling world and how to utilize those tools, as well as the knowledge of how to work with different file types. Both will be helpful tools to utilize with the ever-advancing world of dental prosthetics.” 

He also explains the evolution in the field, using prosthetic dentures as an example.

“While some prefer to stick with the techniques of sculpting in clay on a stone positive and making molds of that, others might be more inclined to go a more digital route by utilizing 3D modeling programs, as well as 3D printing.”

Jordan Patton, Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program Instructor at Douglas Education Center

Haven’t got your fill of special effects as related to dentistry yet? See a few more examples of student creations at Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program Instructor at Douglas Education Center, shown below.

Learn more:

About Tom Savini’s Special Make-up Effects Program at Douglas Education Center: https://www.dec.edu/

About Jordan Patton: https://twitter.com/jpattonfx

Candy invented by a dentist? #countdowntoHalloween

Antque_cotton_candy_eatingWould you believe that a dentist invented that favorite sugary food of the local fair: cotton candy? It’s true! A dentist named William Morrison created it in 1897 with help from candy maker John C. Warton.

Originally called “Fairy Floss,” Dr. Morrison and Mr. Warton debuted their concoction at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, where it cost 25 cents. Today, that doesn’t sound like much for one of our favorite sugary treats, but in 1904, that was half the price of a ticket to enter the fair. Even though it was expensive, many people were intrigued by the spun sugar confection and more than 68,000 boxes were sold!

The early cotton candy machines were unreliable and often broke down. In 1949, Gold Medal Products of Cincinnati, Ohio, introduced a spring base for the machines that improved them. Today, Gold Medal Products manufactures almost all cotton candy machines.

While Morrison and Warton called their product “Fairy Floss,” I’m not sure the name was ever patented. In 1921 another dentist, Joseph Lascaux, improved on the earlier machine and patented the name “Cotton Candy,”  by which the confection is known today in America.

Antique_candy_bookWhile most dentists these days will tell you to stay away from sugar, cotton candy has less than other treats, simply because it’s mostly air. So, if you have the choice between cotton candy, funnel cakes, or deep fried Oreos at the next fair you attend, go for the cotton candy. Just be sure to brush your teeth when you get home, preferably with a toothbrush purchased from Benco Dental.

About the blogger

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

Dr. Melissa Ing teaches STEM through Mini Medical School

Do you remember your middle school anatomy class? The endless evenings spent reading page after page about cells and skeletons was a timeless, yet boring, way to learn about our bodies.

The human muscular and central nervous systems were complex subjects I grappled to understand. I struggled to keep attention in class as my teacher presented slides featuring charts and diagrams of muscle groups and functions I could only abstractly and vaguely comprehend. 

Dr. Melissa Ing, an associate professor in the Dept. of Comprehensive Care at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, employs a unique approach when she teaches. Dr. Ing (shown above, instructed a middle school student) manages, orchestrates and creates real-life scenarios about subjects related to health and dentistry through the Mini Medical School program she organized to teach middle school children at Boston’s Museum of Science.

Dr. Melissa Ing, an associate professor in the Dept. of Comprehensive Care at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (shown at right), and her team instruct students about STEM (Science Technology Engineering Math) topics before delving into interactive medical investigations and procedures. Photos Courtesy Dr. Melissa Ing

“We teach kids the components of a blood vessel and have them build a vessel using different sized red buttons and white marshmallows to represent white blood cells. We teach them about dental forensics and how it can be used to solve a crime.”

Dr. Melissa Ing describes the lessons she teaches on STEM topics.

“Who Stole All the Toothbrushes?” is an activity where students use medical investigation techniques to solve a mystery. Students do more than listen to lectures; they are fully engaged and active participants in the program.

“We made little plots to go with it, and clues, so that the kids can try and learn about forensics. For instance, a fingerprint, a piece of hair, teeth marks, bite marks, saliva, a lip print on a glass…” says Dr. Ing.

She and her team use a problem-based approach and create situations that students must solve using appropriate medical techniques and procedures. 

“Then, for the next module, a Good Samaritan passenger trips over a piece of luggage at the airport breaking his arm. We teach the kids how to cast a broken arm.”

Her students’ favorite lesson: one where they learn how to suture a wound. Of course, they don’t suture a real, live participant, instead they use bananas. 

Dr. Melissa Ing, shown fourth from right, with her Mini Medical School team of Tufts University School of Dental Medicine students and faculty members. Photos Courtesy Dr. Melissa Ing

“The kids are given masks, gowns and gloves, so they have a great time as a doctor for the day. They sometimes can’t stop stitching the bananas and will name their bananas afterward, which is really funny.”

Students of Dr. Melissa Ing learn how to suture a wound using a banana as their patients.

Dr. Ing isn’t alone. She enlists a team of dental students and faculty members who help make the Mini Medical School possible. 

In 2015, she started the program in Boston, but two years ago, she set sail and took the program to Nantucket Island Public Schools, a school district on an isolated island where students have limited resources to learn about STEM fields—which are occupations that encompass Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. 

The Mini Medical School operates on grant funding and the kindness of volunteers who help make it possible, although when she first visited the school district in 2017, the school didn’t have a grant to pay for the program. Luckily, the town helped the school secure the funds.

The following year, the Nantucket school district received a donation from Innovation Pathways, an award granted by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Education, that enabled Dr. Ing and her colleagues to visit a second time.

At Nantucket Island Public School, students use medical instruments and learn how they help industry professionals every day. Photos Courtesy Dr. Melissa Ing

Dr. Ing draws on nearly 30 years of dental experience. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Western Ontario and a Doctor of Dental Medicine degree from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine.

After completing her studies, Dr. Ing built and operated her own private practice and taught at the University of Connecticut. Shortly after, she became a full-time employee at UConn, where she held various positions, such as Team Leader and Director of Predoctoral Clinics. After 20 years there, she secured an associate professor position at her alma mater—Tufts University—and began teaching in 2011.

What’s next for Dr. Melissa Ing’s Mini Medical School?

The program will continue at Boston’s Museum of Science. Through grant funding, Dr. Ing and her team hope to return to Nantucket for a third year. She plans to visit Martha’s Vineyard for the first time as well, where students await the opportunity to suture bananas and learn about dental and medical professions.

STEM fields have grown to 17.3 million jobs or 79 percent since 1990, according to the Pew Research Center. Dr. Ing and her Mini Medical School are helping inspire the scientist, physicians and dentists of tomorrow.

Celebrate November, Women and Girls in STEM Month

Find out what the Museum of Science in Boston has in store for Women and Girls in STEM Month: https://www.mos.org/women-and-girls-in-stem-month

Have We Become Sweeter Over Time?

sugar_graphThink about this statistic: in 1900, Americans consumed 90 pounds of sugar per year. By 2008, that number had doubled to 180 pounds per year. The US ranks as having the highest average daily sugar consumption per person. What has happened to our eating habits since 1900?

Hop in the Wayback Machine

Did they just not have accessibility to sugar in the old days? No, sugar has always been around, mostly in the form of honey or maple syrup. Ancient peoples in countries in the Middle East also learned to develop it from cane stalks. This process eventually worked its way to the West Indies. By the 18th century, the majority of sugar for export was produced in the Caribbean, to be sent to American and England.

But Didn’t We Make Sugar Here?

Didn’t we have sugar plantations here? Sure, but due to the relatively short growing season in the American south, US sugar consumption has always relied on substantial imports. In the decade preceding the Civil War, sugar cane producers in the South supplied only about 1/3 of America’s consumption and the cost of sugar fluctuated periodically. Producing sugar was a labor-intensive operation.

Victorian-Era-Candy-Making-1More Sugar, Please!

Still, with the majority of sugar production coming from the West Indies, and with cheap labor and improvements in mechanization, the cost of sugar over time during the 19th century became more affordable. This was reflected in the change in American diets by the middle of the 19th century. Americans began eating more jams, candy, cocoa, and other sweetened foods.

confectioneryKids Will Be Kids

People in the 19th century are not that far removed from us, in their likes and dislikes. In 1857, The Ohio Journal of Education, Volume 6, described an “Object Lesson” where the children were invited to list “things to be seen”. The results were listed by the teacher on the blackboard. Among the items listed were different types of foods, like meats, pies, and of course, candy. They were children, after all. This gives us a convenient list of candy that children of the mid-19th century liked. And there were many. Among them:

Pop-corn, peppermint, cream, molasses, rose, nut, clove, butterscotch, sugar plums, lemon drops, French kisses, cinnamon, wintergreen, sour drops, hoarhound, gum drops, lavender…

More candy…

As the century wore on, mechanization of candy production and sugar-making improved and sugar became cheaper and more readily available. This meant more candy and sweet stuff available and being consumed by the public. Sugar and candy were presented as pure and good for you.

Is this healthy?

By the 1970s, high fructose corn syrup was introduced into the US food industry and soon became prevalent in many foods, even those that don’t seem to require sweetener, like salad dressings and frozen pizza. High fructose corn syrup is cheap to produce and mimics sugar in its taste and function. Consumption of fructose has climbed steadily since the 1970s, from 37 grams per day to 62.5 grams per day in the early 2000s. This is the start of the “hidden sugar” in American processed food. But is all this sugar entirely healthy? The messaging the American public has been getting regarding our diet since the 1970s has been that fat is bad and sugar is, if not exactly good for us, certainly not bad for us. But is that entirely true…

Enter a Dental Crusader

It seems the Sugar Research Foundation, the sugar lobby that is extremely active in Washington politics, working on behalf of the sugar industry, “has worked to influence the types of research questions that our federal agencies pursue, withheld important knowledge about how our bodies metabolize sugar and skewed research to exonerate their product.” This from Dr. Cristin Kearns in the summer, 2019 Incisal Edge magazine. Dr. Kearns sees herself as a dentist-turned-journalist/crusader. She is featured in the summer issue of Incisal Edge magazine, produced by Benco Dental, where she explains that she was a dentist and director of a public health clinic in Denver. She is now at USCF, working to uncover the truth about how harmful sugar can be for our teeth and our diet.

OldDesignShop_AtmoresMincemeatAdCard2

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

It’s Thursday and Benco’s got #6NeatThings you should know about

The nation’s largest family-owned dental distributor strives to make it simple to stay up to date with the latest equipment and technology. 

Benco Dental is #drivingdentistryforward with the newest and coolest technology doctors need in the form of its #SixNeatThings promotion.

Minimize waste and optimize price-effectiveness with Ivoclar Vivadent’s Adhese Universal.

Click and Bond! Universal adhesion arrives in an advanced delivery form.

Adhese Universal is a single-component, light-cured universal adhesive for direct and indirect bonding procedures that features compatibility with all etching techniques.

The Adhese Universal from Ivoclar Vivadent.

Adhese Universal is beneficial because it has high-bond strength and virtually no sensitivity. It’s also available in a traditional bottle, as well as a unique VivaPen delivery. 

The VivaPen offers advantages such as: 

  • Fast and convenient direct intra-oral application 
  • Lowest cost per application
    • Offers 190 single-tooth applicators 
  • 67% less material waste, compared to a conventional bottle 

Those interested in the Adhese Universal can read more about it here.

Dress your whole office staff in style with garments from Benco Brands 

Benco offers a variety of different garments to suit every need of your office: 

  • Benco Dental Premium Lab Coats 
  • Benco Dental Lab Coats 
  • ValuLine Lab Jackets 
  • Benco Dental Premium Isolation Gowns 
  • Benco Dental Isolation Gowns 
  • ValuLine Isolation Gowns 

Maxmize your comfort and keep your staff and your patients safe from cross-contamination with any of the garments offered by Benco Dental.

Click here to read more information on the garments. 

Get excellent material quality and outstanding processing characteristics for fast milling and polishing with the VITA SUPRINITY PC zirconia-reinforced block. 

The VITA SUPRINITY PC offers several benefits:

  • Partially crystalized 
  • Offers a fine grain 
  • Has high-accuracy share reproduction 
  • Has the strength of 541 MPa
VITA SUPRINITY PC 3 block options: A1-T, A2-T, A3-T.

The VITA SUPRINITY PC is even designed for minimal wall thickness which means it can be milled with very thin edges all while preventing any chipping.

When dealing with things like posterior and anterior crowns or veneers, don’t settle for anything less than the VITA SUPRINITY PC.

Learn more about the VITA SUPRINITY PC by clicking here

Never deal with accidental spillage again with Vista Dental Products’ Dripless Syringe 

When doing Endo irrigation procedures, protect you and your patients from the risk of bleach stains, damage to skin, eyes and oral mucosa. Costs no more than a standard syringe.

The pre-tipped syringes increase efficiency and lower costs from waste. 

The Dripless Syringe offered by Vista Dental Products.

The Dripless Syringe comes with several benefits: 

  • Reduced risk of bleach stains 
  • Reduced risk of skin irritation 
  • Reduced risk of damage to the eyes and oral mucosa 

The Dripless Syringe comes with 27ga side-vented needles that are tipped with the Appli-Vac Irrigating Tips, all while costing no more than a standard irrigating syringe. 

To learn more about Vista Dental Products’ Dripless Syringe, click here

Help your patients keep periodontal disease at bay with the Perio Restore™ Oral Cleansing Gel.

Fight bacteria in the pocket. Control and reverse early-to-late stages of periodontal disease. Perio Restore provides significant reduction of bacteria

The cleansing gel is a 1.7% hydrogen peroxide formula with mint flavor that helps reduces the effects of the disease when used in conjunction with personalized perio treatment trays between each dental visit. 

The Perio Restore™ Oral Cleansing Gel by DenMat.

The Perio Restore™ Oral Cleansing Gel can be used by a variety of patients: 

  • Those who have inconsistent homecare routines 
  • Those suffering from any stage of gum disease 
  • Those with extensive rotations like crowns, bridges or bonding 
  • Those who are high-risk during advanced medical treatments 

Click here to learn more about the Perio Restore™ Oral Cleansing Gel

The KaVo PROPHYflexTM 4 air polisher makes daily prophylaxis treatments easier, quicker and more thorough.

The KaVo PROPHYflexTM offers a seemless design that allows for disassembly, cleansing, disinfection, and the sterilization of the device to ensure the best possible infection control for patients. 

The KaVo PROPHYflexTM 4 is offered in a variety of colors.

The KaVo PROPHYflexTM 4 also offers several key benefits: 

  • Highly precise powder jet offers less powder mist
  • Narrow canal shape offers improved visibility during supragingival cleaning 
  • 360° rotation grip sleeve offers access to hard-to-reach spots 
  • Adjustable lengths for the handpiece offer the perfect fit for you 

Learn more about the KaVo PROPHYflexTM here

Celebrate the art of dental invention with the Edison Awards

Celebrate a savings of $300 if you nominate your dental innovation by the 2019 Edison Awards™ early bird nomination deadline on October 18. Nominate today: https://edisonawards.com/

The Edison Best New Product Awards™ is an annual competition honoring excellence in new product and service development, marketing, human-centered design, and innovation. Past winners have included Fortune 500s, small startups, and everything in between.

Companies and dental professionals who’ve recently launched outstanding innovations are invited to apply by November 22, 2019, but can save $300 on the entry fee by nominating next week.

Need some encouragement?

Meet some previous honorees in dentistry. Edison Award-winning dental innovators at the Gold, Silver and Bronze have included:

2015: Vatech, 3M, 3D Systems, Aribex, Convergent Dental, Kerr Endodontics, Olympus Corporation of the Americas, NSK, Molar Media Mount, Benco Dental, and Inventionstring.

2016: Solea ®  by Convergent Dental, Multi-Axis Spiral Suction by Ghost Mfg, Oral B Pro 5000 with Bluetooth by Procter & Gamble, Dr. Kim’s Shadowless Headlamp by DrKimUSA.com

2017: ECO Balance by GLO Science™, Inc., Throat Scope® by Holland Healthcare Inc. and 3M™ Mobile True Definition Scanner by 3M.

2018: Senior Mobile Dental, The Periogen Company, Akervall Technologies Inc., Carestream Dental and St. Renatus, LLC.

2019: Invisalign Treatment with mandibular advancement by Align Technology, Bond Apatite® by Augma Biomaterials®, Airway Armor™ by Zirc Dental Products Inc., Goccles® by Pierrel Pharma S.r.L., CS 9600 cone beam computed tomography system by Carestream Dental.

Ready to nominate

https://edisonawards.com/

Heed some 200-year-old advice: Floss your teeth!

Champion_Floss
A dispenser of Champion floss in the Benco Dental museum.

A large, heavy glass dispenser, filled with dental floss, is featured at the Benco Dental museum in Northeast Pennsylvania.  This “Champion” dental floss dispenser, from Johnson & Johnson, circa early 1900s, is much different from the lightweight, small floss dispensers we use today.  It has more in common with a paperweight. Still, the floss featured inside is not unfamiliar to people today.
When did flossing between teeth emerge as a health and hygiene practice? Turns out, dentists have been telling patients to floss since the early 19th century!

Quacks in the Profession

Floss came about due to the lack of professionalism in dentistry. Back in the early 19th century, the job of a dentist was not taken seriously. Most dentists of the time were little more than quacks. A Baltimore dentist in 1826 bemoaned this lack of respect in his book, Principles of Surgery:

This unsettled and vague state of practical Dental Surgery, not only exposes the profession and the unwary public to the errors of the dentist, but it also leaves the greatest opening for the most impudent and ignorant pretenders to assume a profession, which they utterly disgrace.… It is a well-known fact that there are quacks in every professions, and in every country; but it cannot be denied that they most particularly abound in the United States of America and England.

Dentists at that time didn’t know enough about how to prevent or treat tooth decay. They didn’t even know what caused it. One man was determined to improve the standing of dentists by learning all he could, and finding ways to help people keep their teeth intact. His name: Levi Spear Parmly. Born in Braintree, Vermont in 1790, he was a practicing dentist in New Orleans by 1818.

Slow Progress

Dr. Parmly stated he blamed the “slow progress of the dental sciences” for society’s lack of respect for dentistry. Parmly’s prescription for progress: “A great improvement of this department of surgery, will depend on pointing out to society the importance of preventing diseases of the teeth.”

Parmly vaguely suggested an institution for this kind of training and education, but nothing came of it. He decided to remedy his own deficiencies by heading to London in 1819, to learn all he could about dentistry. When he returned to America, he knew all there was to know at that time. He set up in New York and became one of the era’s most respected dentists. He believed that cavities were caused by foreign matter on the teeth and the best way to combat them was to keep the teeth very clean. He introduced flossing as the best way to prevent dental disease. It would take another 100 years for the idea to catch on.

In childhood, before the loss of the temporary teeth, the mouth should be regularly cleaned every evening,…the brush should at first be but gently applied, and then particular care taken to pass the waxed silk in the interstices, and round the necks of the teeth, where lodgements of the food (the causes of disease) are usually formed.

From Dr. Parmly’s book, A Practical Guide to the Management of the Teeth (1819).

Champion Floss to the Rescue!

Champion_Dental_floss - Newspapers.com
An ad for dental floss from 1945.

Despite advocating waxed silk to floss between teeth, evidence suggests that few people took up Dr. Parmly on his advice, as there was no commercial floss in the early 19th century.

*  In the early 1900s, Johnson & Johnson had entered the scene with their sterile waxed silk, Champion Floss, which was distributed in small, sterile tubes.
*By the early 1930s, floss was advertised in many major newspapers  throughout the U.S.
* By the 1940s, when silk became scarce due to the war effort, nylon was substituted and the rest is dental history.

Dr. Parmly was right all along:

Flossing is the best way to remove decay-causing food particles from your teeth. So whether you use old-fashioned waxed nylon floss, or Benco’s newest teeth-cleaning tool, the PRO-SYS® JetFloss, floss your teeth! Your mouth will thank you.

WaterFlosser
Benco Dental’s newest tool for fighting tooth decay – the PRO-SYS Jet Floss.

About the Blogger

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.

Women in dentistry to convene at The Blackstone in Chicago next week

A distinguished destination for celebrating change makers in dentistry

Since 1910, The Blackstone has attracted celebrities, socialites, and politicians. It is named after Timothy Blackstone, who was the president of Union Stock Yards and the Chicago & Alton Railroad. 

In 2019 it will host exemplary women in dentistry (read about all six award recipients here!) during the 7th annual Lucy Hobbs Project Celebration. On October 3-5, Benco Dental, in partnership with Cameo Dental Specialists, invites women in dentistry to bring their dental team together and join a special celebration of in Chicago… three days of fun, networking, and discovery focused on living, practicing, and thriving smarter. 
Read more about the 10 incredible speakers, including featured guest Poppy Harlow: https://thedailyfloss.com/?s=lucy+hobbs+celebration+the+blackstone

If you haven’t already, register today. Then take a moment to learn more the historic venue where it will take place.

Heads of state, legendary mob bosses and treasured artwork


Aptly named “The Hotel of Presidents,” this historic Chicago hotel has hosted several heads of state, including Presidents Teddy Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy and Jimmy Carter.

The hotel also had a notorious streak, as it was favored by legendary mob bosses “Lucky” Luciano and Al Capone. It’s been said that Al Capone held meetings while getting his haircut in the windowless barbershop at The Blackstone.

Rivaling the most prestigious Chicago art museums, The Blackstone’s art collection is one of the city’s treasures. With over 1,600 works, primarily created by local artists, the collection includes pieces that not only conjure up Chicago past and present, but also evoke this legendary hotel’s regal architecture.

When you browse the selection of works, you can almost hear the sounds of Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne and Nat King Cole through the halls. On permanent display throughout guest rooms, meeting rooms, and public spaces, our art collection is an extension of The Blackstone’s role as a Chicago cultural icon.

Enjoy one of the city’s most intriguing art collections during your stay, and come away with an enriched perspective of Chicago. 

Prepare to be enchanted:

From HGTV straight to your dental practice!

If you can’t get enough of the amazing creations of Fixer Upper stars Chip and Joanna Gaines (shown) think about incorporating one of the stylish wall coverings from Joanna’s Magnolia Home Collection into your dental practice. Available through CenterPoint Design at Benco Dental, these unique designs are distributed by Momentum Textiles & Wallcovering

Shown above, a dental operatory at Benco Dental’s CenterPoint East showroom that features stylish wall covering Avenue WC, from Joanna’s Magnolia Home Collection as distributed by Momentum Textiles & Wallcovering.

“We at Centerpoint Design choose to use wallcovering in many different areas, for many different reasons,”  says Megan Chuzas, Interior Designer at Benco Dental’s CenterPoint Design.

“A larger scale pattern can be used to draw attention to a well-lighted logo wall.  In restrooms, wall covering is often a code requirement in order to help with infection control and clean-ability.  In high-traffic areas, wall covering is used to provide added wall protection.” 

Megan Chuzas, Interior Designer with Benco Dental’s CenterPoint Design group.

Known for her modern farmhouse style, Joanna Gaines incorporates classic designs in her collection, staying true to her brand, while still making them feel current and on trend. Many of her designs are subtle enough to be used throughout an entire space. While others that are larger in scale or made of natural materials, are more well-suited for accent areas or a feature wall. 

Stylish wall covering styles from Joanna’s Magnolia Home Collection and available through CenterPoint Design at Benco Dental, distributed by Momentum Textiles & Wallcovering.

Welcoming and comfortable with a dash of charm, classic farmhouse style is more popular than ever thanks to shows like HGTV’s Fixer Upper. In response to the minimalist trend that was popular in the 1990s and early 2000s, people are now embracing the tradition and surrounding themselves in an environment that makes them feel right at home.

“There are a number of other creative ways to incorporate wall covering into your office design.  Work with a Centerpoint Designer to find out how,” adds Megan Chuzas, CenterPoint Interior Designer at Benco Dental.

Want to add Joanna Gaines’ wall coverings into your dental practice?

Call 1.800.GOBENCO today.