‘Fall’ing in love with new dental innovations

This cycle of 6 Neat Things in order are, Ivoclar’s Cervitec Plus Varnish, Dental and Surgical Bibs from GantGuard™, the Clorox Versa Sure Wipes, the SciCan G4 Statclave, the Benco Brands VPS Connector and Ribbon Holder and the VOCO Admira Fusion x-tra.

The nation’s largest family-owned dental distributor strives to make it simple to stay up to date with the latest equipment and technology. 

Benco Dental is driving dentistry forward with the newest and coolest technology doctors need in the form of its Six Neat Things promotion.

Protect at-risk, exposed and sensitive tooth surfaces with the Cervitec Plus Varnish from Ivoclar

The proven combination of 1% chlorhexidine and 1% thymol firmly adheres to tooth surfaces, creating a shield of long-lasting protection. 

The Cervitec Plus Varnish from Ivoclar.

The Cervitec Plus Varnish can be used for things such as:

  • Exposed cervical margins 
  • Crowns and bridges 
  • Implants 
  • Orthodontic brackets 
  • Proximal areas 
  • Fissures 
  • Restorations 

Ivoclar’s Cervitec Plus Varnish even offers a transparent varnish. 

For more information on Ivoclar’s Cervitec Plus Varnish, click here.

Keep your patients’ clothing protected with the GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs.

These bibs remove the cold, uncomfortable alligator bibs used in the past. The GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs also free up storage by removing the clutter of chains. 

The GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs.

The GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs offer several key benefits: 

  • Keeps clothing clean and dry
  • Avoids stains
  • Self-adhesive 
  • Ability to be repositioned 
  • No cross-contamination 

Click here for more information on the GantGuard™ Dental and Surgical Bibs.

Keep all of your office surfaces clean with the Clorox Versa Sure Wipes

These disinfectant wipes are alcohol-free, have low odor and low residue. 

The Clorox Versa Wipes kill bacteria and fungus like MRSA and TB in as little as two minutes. They can also kill viruses like mumps and measles in as little as 30 seconds.

The Clorox VersaSure Wipes.

The wipes can be used on surfaces commonly found in healthcare settings such as: 

  • Common plastics 
  • Stainless steel 
  • Glass 
  • High-end finishes like Corian™ and marble 

For more information about the Clorox Versa Sure Wipes click here.

Sterilize all of your dental equipment with the SciCan G4 Statclave

The sleek design can get equipment from dirty to sterile in as quick as 38 seconds.

The SciCan G4 Statclave connects to smart devices to provide all vital notifications right at your fingertips.

The SciCan G4 Statclave.

The sterilizer offers several features to ensure the cleanliness of your equipment:

  • Fast 
  • Closed-door drying
  • 11-inch chamber capacity 
  • Gentle sterilization 
  • Versatile amount of filling and draining options

Click here to read more about the SciCan G4 Statclave.

Never waste impression material again with the Benco Brands VPS Connector and Ribbon Holder

With the ability to transfer leftover impression material from one cartridge to another.

The VSP Connector and Ribbon Holder from Benco Dental.

The reusable ribbon holders enable a strong connection between cartridges.

Learn more about the Benco Brands VPS Transfer Connector and Ribbon Holder here.

Cure with simplicity and the VOCO Admira Fusion x-tra 

The Admira Fusion x-tra’s omni-chromatic shade means there’s no more guesswork and no more wasted shades.

The Admira Fusion x-tra from VOCO.

The Admira Fusion x-tra offers several key benefits: 

  • Extra low shrinkage 
  • Extra depth of cure 
  • Extra high biocompatibility 

The easy to polish, highly stain resistant restorative offers a high gloss finish.

Click here for more information about the VOCO Admira Fusion x-tra.

For details on any of these products, call 1.800.GOBENCO

How to Choose Flooring for Your Dental Practice

Flooring that will stand the test of time is as essential as choosing a comfortable, sturdy dental chair at a dental practice. You want your patient to feel secure. You want the dexterity to give them a perfect smile; likewise, you want vinyl flooring that’s safe, durable and attractive so you can give your patients excellent care in a stylish environment.

“In the world of dentistry, we have seen Luxury Vinyl Tile (LVT) become a staple of the dental office floor. These floors can be found almost always in operatories, but we have also seen a trend using this material not only in the clinical area, but within the whole office.”

Amanda Griffith, CenterPoint Design Interior Designer

The Mohawk Group offers contemporary Luxury Vinyl Tile (shown at top) style that looks great in an operatory, office or reception room. Before you begin your design plans, there are factors to chew over. Maybe you’re expanding your practice or are planning to start your first. Here are five things to consider before you buy a vinyl floor:

Durability

When you purchase flooring, especially if it’s your first time, it’s important to remember you’re buying commercial vinyl versus residential vinyl. Commercial vinyl flooring applications require a 20 mil wear layer in order to withstand heavy foot traffic and equipment. Wear layer in an important factor to consider when choosing LVT. Vinyl flooring can be measured by different wear layer thicknesses, such as 12, 20, 30, or 40 mils.

Commercial vinyl flooring typically ranges in thickness from 2.5 mm to 3 mm. Some commercial spaces install vinyl up to 5 mm, which allows the vinyl floor to align with the height of the carpet.

IMG_4758
The image features Shaw Contact “Cut” with a Cacao finish in 18″ x 18″ sections.

The photo above features Shaw Contact’s “Cut” LVT with two-to-three vertical accents in either brass metallic or nickel metallic. The unique visual of Cut mimics natural end-cut wood floors in which individual woodblock tiles connect in an imperfect, organic installation; therefore, individual woodblock visuals do not align.

“LVT has come a long way over the years with high-performance value, an array of aesthetic designs, and many benefits such as durability, cleanability, water resistance, price, life span, and maintenance.”

Amanda Griffith, CenterPoint Design Interior Designer

Texture & Size

Two characteristics, texture and size, should be considered when selecting a vinyl floor. Textures range from smooth to light texture to highly textured.

Patcraft Oxidized
Oxidized by Patcraft; photo grab from patcraft.com

Vinyl flooring also has a variety of size options, such as 4 inch to 9 inch wide planks to 24 inch by 24 inch wide tiles to everything in between. If you are looking for something a bit unique, you can also find hexagon and triangle shaped vinyl flooring. Whatever your preference, there is one to fit your style and need.

The photo above shows Oxidized tiles by Patcraft.

Appearance

Strength is an essential factor in flooring. But if it doesn’t look good, why buy it? The LVT you purchase will be in your office for years, if not decades. Choosing vinyl that enhances your practice’s appeal will introduce an allure your patients will appreciate.

Mannington - Amtico Wood
Amtico Wood by Mannington; screengrab from manningtoncommercial.com

Mannington Commercial provides a wide-array of LVT design options to match your existing or planned dental practice, such as their Amtico Wood, (seen above).

Maintenance 

Many dentists choose to put LVT throughout their practices due to the fact that it requires little maintenance. Shaw Contact features ExoGuardTM, an exclusive urethane finish that protects against commercial traffic and requires no polishing.

ExoGuardTM consists of two elements. First, a top coat adds resistance to scratches, scuffing, and staining. Second, a primer coat — a layer added to the topcoat — adds adhesion and durability. Having LVT with this type of top layer can reduce the frequency and cost of cleaning services, saving you time and money.

Lifespan 

Luxury vinyl floors are designed to last. Every LVT floor provider mentioned in this article offers a limited commercial 10-year warranty, at a minimum.

Tarkett - IndigenousEarth_
Indigenous Earth by Tarkett; photo grab from tarkett.com

Like any new product you buy, you want to see it, touch it—even walk on it! If you’re ready to order new LVT for your practice, visit one of three CenterPoint Design showrooms of the nation’s leading dental supplier, Benco Dental.

“Whether you are refreshing an old space or building new, LVT is a great option,” Amanda Griffith, CenterPoint Design Interior Designer at Benco Dental.

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Disclaimer: Warranty claims are subject to manufacturer approval. 

Arguments for equality in dentistry and in life #tbt #WomensEqualityDay

The blog is part of a series paying tribute to pioneers in dentistry. Celebrate changemaking women in dentistry at the 7th annual Lucy Hobbs Project Celebration, set for October 3-5 at The Blackstone in Chicago. Register today: https://www.regmadeeasy.com/benco/the-lucy-hobbs-project/2019/

I am writing this post on August 26, #WomensEqualityDay. It’s the 99th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, that gave women the right to vote. Today, I’m focusing on a few voices that advocated for and against allowing women to practice dentistry. There were many against, but only a few brave souls who felt women were equal to men and that dentistry was a place where women could excel.

Sarah Grimke, Early Suffragette
SaraGrimke

I ask no favors for my sex. All I ask our brethren is that they will take their feet off our necks. – Sarah Grimke, early suffragette.

Dr. Lucy Hobbs Taylor

The Dental Times Dispute

If you follow The Lucy Hobbs Project, you’re familiar with the story of Lucy Hobbs, the young woman who sought a career as a dentist, but was constantly denied entrance to dental school based solely on her gender. This was common across a range of educational institutes; law schools, medical schools, and dental schools, among others, frequently denied women admittance to their programs.

Dental Times

Around the same time Lucy Hobbs was finishing up her dental studies in Ohio, a dispute was brewing in Pennsylvania between the pages of The Dental Times, featuring arguments both for and against allowing women to be dentists.

The 1866, Volume III, Number 4 issue of The Dental Times featured two articles, one advocating for women in dentistry, and the other arguing they are “not fitted physically for such taxing work”.

girl-graduates

The first article is the Valedictory address of James Truman, DDS, dean of the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery from 1865-1876. In it, he states:

The recognition of the right of every human being to an equal share in the privileges that we enjoy, has not yet become a principle of faith and practice, as I think it should. We say to one-half of the human family, stitch, stitch, darn stockings, make shoes for a shilling, stand behind counters for two or three dollars per week, do anything, but don’t enter the sacred precincts that we have marked out for our peculiar benefit…Talent is of no sex, color or clime…

This thought was revolutionary for the time and Dr. Truman knew it.

…It may be that I stand alone in these views, both with the Faculty of this College and the audience; but I trust not, as in my judgement, the advancement of the world depends, to a large extent, upon their adoption.

The Opposing View

JesseCastleLaMoreaux

Within the same scientific journal, there came the opposing view, with the glaring title, “Dental Surgery – Should Females Practice It?” Its author, Dr. George T. Barker, editor of The Dental Times, emphatically believed women were not suited for the physical rigors of dentistry.

Dr. Barker states, in part:

Should females be encouraged to enter the dental profession? I contend they should not, and it is with no disrespect that the assertion is made. The same reason holds good against females practicing dentistry that it does against a feeble male, for the reasons as previously stated. The very form and structure of a woman unfit her for its duties…

By 1872, three women were admitted to the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery; however, after completing the first year, they were not allowed to return because they were women. When that occurred, there was a dissenting vote by a member of the faculty. The matter then was brought to a committee of members of the board, who rendered the decision that “a student could not be cast out without due cause.” In 1874, two of the three women graduated from the college. Obviously some agreed with Dean Truman, regarding women in dentistry.

1911-Suffragettes

On this #WomensEqualityDay, we are glad that more and more people are of the mind of Dr. Truman rather than Dr. Barker. Here’s to more women in dentistry and to the pioneers, like Lucy Hobbs Taylor, Henriette Hirschfeld, and others who defied convention to become dentists.

Next year, the 19th Amendment turns 100! Here’s to more “firsts” for women!

About the blogger

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.