One-Day Dental MBA, Cannabis Culture and Dentistry … these topics and more are all part of a May 3 CE event in PA

Renowned dental experts, including Dr. Howard Farran, will convene in Northeast Pennsylvania on Friday, May 3 to share knowledge with lecture topics as varied as “The Fearless Dental Team,” “Cannabis Culture and Dentistry,” “Win the Insurance Game,” “Oxygen, Please,” and “One-Day Dental MBA”.

Dental professionals will gain CE credits and unique insight from Howard Farran, DDS, MBA, Leslie Icenogle, Kelli Swanson Jaecks, RDH, MA and Kay Huff RDA at the 2019 Spring Fling sponsored by Benco Dental at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Highway 315, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702.

For details, call 1.800.GOBENCO.

Want a sneak preview?

Screenshot 2019-05-01 17.25.29Dr. Farran’s “One-Day Dental MBA” lecture explains how to help build a remarkable dental office that will make a difference to the community. Spend the day learning practical hands-on applications that can be immediately translated to a dental practice team.

During “Win the Insurance Game,” Leslie Icenogle invites dental teams to maximize reimbursement for services rendered by discussing accurate coding and required supporting documentation, prompt filing and follow-up, common posting errors, inaccuracies in explanation of benefits and improper denials.
Screenshot 2019-05-01 17.30.35

Kelli Swanson Jaecks, RDH, MA presents “Cannabis Culture and Dentistry” and “Oxygen, Please!”  The first discussion focuses on a rapid change in recent years in both public opinion and reported science concerning marijuana use and its effects.  The course will take a closer look at the changing Cannabis Culture:

What is the difference between hemp, and marijuana, THC and CBD? What about medical vs. recreational use? Methods of ingesting marijuana will be discussed, with their effects on the oral cavity. What are preventive oral health strategies dental professionals can utilize to best protect patients?

Screenshot 2019-05-01 17.38.32Jaecks’ second presentation aims to empower health care professionals to make positive choices for their physical and mental selves, resulting in better care for the patients they serve. Taking a cue from the American Nurses Association’s campaign Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation™ , health promotion strategies from this course will center on four focus areas: physical activity, sleep, nutrition, and quality of life. Healthy practitioners better ensure healthier patients.

In “The Fearless Dental Team,” Kay Huff, RDA asks the vital questions:

Are you afraid that your patients or your team won’t accept change? Does every decision your office makes revolve around the “what-ifs”?

She then reaffirms the concepts that it is vital to have a vision and share it. It’s OK to ask Screenshot 2019-05-01 17.41.30your patients for money and get paid. It’s OK not to work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

She directs attendees to “Push fear aside and discover the success and benefits of a Fearless Dental Team.”

 

Support Oral Cancer Cause at today’s SocialThon #occsharingiscaring

In conjunction with the amazing Oral Cancer Cause, Inc. team of Linda Miles and Robin Morrison, John Stamper, Founder of DentalCast Productions announces that Dentistry’s First Ever, “Socialthon” will be hosted LIVE on the DentalCast Productions Facebook Page today, April 26,  from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST Donate today: https://oralcancercause.org/product/2019-socialthon-donation/ Stamper referred to today […]

Are you looking to sell your dental practice? Find out the 10 must-haves on a buyer’s wish list.

When prospective dental practice owners research existing offices for purchase, certain factors rank in the top 10 on their checklists? It’s safe to say Wayne Oplinger, Transitions Analyst for Benco Dental, knows what makes any business – especially a dental practice – successful. Prior to joining Benco as a local Territory Rep in 2011, Wayne […]

Lucy Hobbs Project — nominate honorees, register for the annual celebration.

Women in dentistry, now is the time to take action.

April 26 is the deadline to nominate an honoree for the 2019 Lucy Hobbs Project Awards.

Nominate a woman in dentistry today.

During its annual celebration, The Lucy Hobbs Project honors exemplary women in the dental community. Now, through the April 26, 2019 deadline, Benco Dental encourages people to nominate in six award categories:

  • Woman to Watch: An up-and-coming leader who utilizes her position to create positive change,
  • Industry Icon: A trailblazer who is consistently recognized and admired for her work in dentistry,
  • Mentor: An advisor who recognizes the importance of supporting, educating and encouraging others,
  • Innovator: A groundbreaker who demonstrates a willingness to implement new technologies and business processes without fear of potential failure,
  • Humanitarian: An altruist who works tirelessly for a cause that benefits the well-being of others, and
  • Clinical Expert: A skillful practitioner who embraces advancements and integrates them into patient care.

Individuals and organizations are invited to submit nominations. Self-nominations are accepted. Entrants are directed to the 2019 Lucy Hobbs Project Awards Nomination form: https://www.judgify.me/LHP-nominations2019

Speaking of the 7th Annual Celebration….

The 2019 Annual Celebration is the perfect retreat for a dental practice. Thought leaders, panelists and networking events will focus on more than individual wellness. They’ll impart strategies for incorporating wellness concepts throughout a practice to build a happier, more productive and engaged team.

The theme: Mind+Body+Soul. Achieve Your Personal Best Balance, At Home & Work.
The idea: Celebrate wellness together with your entire team.
Details:

When: October 3 – 5, 2019
Where: The Blackstone Hotel, 636 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60605
Ticket price: $199.00
Event registration closes on Friday, September 27, 2019.

Register today – space is limited for this amazing event: https://www.regmadeeasy.com/benco/the-lucy-hobbs-project/2019/
For more event details, please contact: Ali Riviello, am5963@benco.com 
or 570-602-7068

MOM-n-PA to host 2-day free dental clinic for people in need in Wilkes-Barre, PA

Volunteers, sponsors and patients are all invited to participate at an event that provides free dental care on Thursday, June 6 at the Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. WHAT IS MOM-n-PA? MOM-n-PA  is an annual two-day free dental clinic for underserved Pennsylvanians in which dental treatment is provided at NO COST to individuals who cannot afford dental care. Treatment […]

On #EarthDay, Orsing & Premier help dental practices plan for a greener future

When you’re planning for the future of your dental practice, why not plan for the future of the Earth as well. From environmentally-friendly, EPA-compliant cleaning products from Premier to bamboo cups and saliva ejectors made from sugarcane from Orsing under Directa Dental Group (shown above), dental product manufacturers putting planet love at a premium.  Below, learn […]

Ready to Mbrace ergonomics to support wellbeing at your dental practice? Check out this design tip.

Today, successful organizations — especially dental practices — are often the ones that can generate the best ideas the fastest.  Practices rely on technology to fuel the process — sharing information on monitors, using videoconferencing to connect with colleagues, and developing content using touchscreens. But problems arise quickly when the systems and devices in use […]

Electrifying & Deadly Developments

Ritter_Xray20s
An early Ritter X-ray unit from the 1920s, courtesy of the museum at Benco Dental, Pittston.

The first American book on X-rays (discovered in 1895 by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen of Wurzburg, Germany) appeared in 1896 and by July of that year the intraoral fluoroscope was invented by William H. Rollins. Also in July of 1896, Dr. Charles Edmund Kells, Jr. (1856-1928) taught the first clinic on the use of X-rays in dentistry. He would go on to be fascinated by the science of X-rays and also electricity. His passion for X-rays would cost him dearly. Kells became one of the most noted of a handful of “X-ray Martyrs”.

Meet the most noted of “X-ray Martyrs”

CharlesEdmundKellsJr
Photo courtesy of Jeff Sengstack

Dr. Kells, born in New Orleans, was the son of a successful dentist. In 1876 he enrolled as a student at the New York Dental College. There he met and became friendly with technicians from Thomas Edison’s Menlo Park laboratory. He started to spend time in the lab and was fascinated by Edison’s efforts in early incandescent lighting and his experiments in electricity. He could already see the applications for dentistry. It was a whole new untested frontier and he wanted to be at the forefront of it. When the Edison Electric Light Company began to supply power to major industries in New Orleans, Dr. Kells signed up for service, becoming the city’s first dentist to use street current to power his dental equipment. Kells wired his office himself and connected it to the power grid outside his office.

High hopes for the uses of electricity

RitterMachinesAd
An advertisement of some of the many early dental equipment that was electrically powered.

Dr. Kells had high hopes for the uses of electricity, both in the dental office and elsewhere. Like Edison, his mind began to whirl with all sorts of new inventions, not the least of which was for an automatic electric suction pump which drained saliva, a wonderful invention that did away with using surgical sponges in both dentistry and general surgery. He also registered patents for other items powered by electricity, including an electric thermostat, a fire extinguisher, and a drinking fountain.

Between early electricity and early X-rays, the dental office was a minefield of dangers, some of which were recognized and others which had yet to appear.

While Dr. Kells’s ordeal with X-rays took time to be realized, he understood the dangers of electricity almost as soon as he hooked up his office. He was so worried about it, he sent a letter to the editor of the “Dental Cosmos”, the leading professional dental publication at the time, asking him about the risks in using electricity in the dental operatory. Even as he did so, at the same time he sent a letter to S.S. White Dental Manufacturing Company, asking if they could make electric dental instruments for him.

SSWhiteAd1915
A 1915 S.S.White ad, featuring electrified equipment.

The editor, Dr. Grier, responded:

“The use of commercial lighting current, as shown by the apparatus exhibited by you, their employment to give the light and heat needed and to actuate the motors employed in the dental office, opens up a fascinating and almost unlimited field of application.… Unfortunately, these currents, especially the light arc, possess an electromotive force and strength far beyond the needs of the case, and therein lies the risk of their employment.… THE POSSIBLE TRANSFERENCE OF THE CURRENT FROM THE APPARATUS TO THE PERSON OF THE OPERATOR OR THE PATIENT.…”

ElectricFearCartoon
An illustration of the freak accident that occurred in New York City many years earlier. This just compounded people’s fear of electricity.

There had been a scare over electricity in New York City several years earlier and people were still not over it. Eventually though, people came to accept electricity in the dental office. Harder to overcome, was the deadly repercussions of all the X-ray experiments Dr. Kells had done, using his own hands.

Now, of course, we understand what happens to repeated exposure of body parts to X-ray, cancer.

In 1913 Kells installed the first commercial X-ray unit made especially for use in dentistry. Dr. Kells, in developing his groundbreaking use of X-rays in dentistry, had developed malignant growths on his left hand. It was the beginning of years of agony. He later noted the dangers of radiation had been recognized even before then, and no knowledgeable doctor would hold a film in the mouth of his patient or in any way expose his hands to the direct rays. Eventually, he had to have the tips of his fingers of his left hand cut off. After more years of exposure, he had to have several fingers removed. That still did not stop the cancerous growths and eventually he had to have his left arm amputated.

Early X-ray machines could be dangerous for more than their radiation. As Dr. Grier had indicated in his response to Kells in “Dental Cosmos”, the electricity that powered these contraptions could also be hazardous. The exposed high-tension wires of these devices caused several serious accidents and a few fatalities by themselves.

Still, today we are indebted to Dr. Kells and other “X-ray Martyrs” like him, who helped make modern dentistry what it is today, despite the early dangers.

About the blogger

Guest blogger Jenn Ochman, Database Publishing Production Specialist in the Branding and Communication Department at Benco Dental, dedicates her time outside work to historical reenactment. She shares knowledge of dental history with TheDailyFloss.com readers on a monthly basis.