Can #NationalPieDay make you smile?

On #NationalPieDay, there’s no reason dentistry can’t have a slice of the fun.

Try a clever recipe for Whoopie Pie Smiles on YouTube.com,

or a giggle-worthy riddle on Twitter:

Screenshot 2018-01-23 15.38.31

 

Then sit back for  a quick review of a few pie fillings. Are some better for your teeth than others?

“While berries are loaded with antioxidants, they will also stain your teeth. Dark berries, like blueberries, have a dark pigmentation that will sit on your teeth and cause discoloration.

No matter if you’re eating berries or drinking coffee and wine, it’s always a good idea to swish with water afterwards or brush your teeth to remove the stain-causing residue. This can help remove the stain from your teeth and keep your teeth light and bright.”

  • Pumpkin power? Hmm. Not so powerful in the form of pie filling, according to Greater Baltimore Prosthodontics:

    Though oral health benefits of pumpkin include the following, they arrive when eating pure and natural pumpkin, not when combined with sugar as most pie fillings are:

    High in Zinc – Zinc deficiency can lead to weak bones and poor dental health but eating pumpkin can combat those issue because it’s high in zinc. Consuming pumpkin can be beneficial for patients with bleeding gums because zinc boosts gum health.

    High in magnesium – Tooth enamel is essential for protecting your teeth and the magnesium in pumpkins works together with calcium to strengthen enamel and resist tooth decay. Calcium needs magnesium to protect your teeth effectively because, without it, the enamel is softer and weaker.

    Vitamin boost – Pumpkin contains Vitamin A that promotes healing and can help damaged gums. Pumpkin also contains Vitamin C that can help strengthen your immune system and defend against oral infections.

Moral of the story? If all this talk of #NationalPieDay has your mouth watering, go ahead and sample a slice of your favorite variety. But remember to brush immediately.

Read more about teeth whitening from the American Dental Association.

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