Excellence is one workshop away

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On Wednesday, Oct. 8, Alan G. Robinson, bestselling author of Ideas Are Free will hold a half-day workshop, “Maximizing Improvement, Lean, and Innovation in Your Organization,” at Benco Dental headquarters in Pittston from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration will begin at 8 a.m.

The workshop will focus on businesses becoming lean, or excellent in any aspect of performance, via the ability to tap into and maximize frontline employee ideas, creativity and innovation. Workshop attendees will learn how to maximize their company’s current idea system or create one that works and how to increase impact, corporate creativity and innovation within their organization. They also will discover the six elements of corporate creativity and how to implement them; acquire new ways to implement lean into their organization; and review real world corporate examples and their results using Robinson’s combined system.

The Family Business Alliance at Wilkes University will host Alan G. Robinson, bestselling author of Ideas Are Free, at the Benco Dental event, and another at the Penn State Worthington Scranton Campus on Tuesday, Oct. 7.

Both events are free and open to the public. Advance registration is required. To RSVP, please contact Lorna Galliford at lorna.galliford@wilkes.edu or call (570) 408-4590 for more information.

Benco Dental is the largest privately-owned dental distribution company in the United States, offering a full array of supplies, equipment and services to dentists across the nation. Founded in 1930 by Benjamin Cohen, the company has remained family-owned and focused on its unique mission to ‘deliver success, smile after smile.’

On Oct. 7 at the Penn State Worthington Scranton Campus in Dunmore, Robinson will present “The Idea-Driven Organization: Unlocking the Power in Bottom-Up Ideas” based on his book of the same title. A light reception and registration will take place from 5:30 to 6 p.m. in the Business Building, Hawk Lecture Hall. The lecture presentation will follow.

Lecture attendees will learn how to maximize frontline employee talent to help grow and improve their company, discover proven concepts to unlock up to 80 percent of their organization’s potential for innovation and discuss real examples of organizations that implement these systems and their results.

Robinson specializes in managing creativity, ideas and innovation and is the co-author of seven books which have been translated into more than 25 languages. His bestselling book Ideas Are Free was named Reader’s Choice by Fast Company magazine and one of the 30 best business books of 2004 by Soundview Executive Books. It was also featured on ABC World News and CNN Headline News.

Robinson has advised more than 250 organizations in 20 countries on how to improve their performance. He has served on the Board of Examiners of the United States’ Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and on the Board of Examiners for the Shingo Prizes for Excellence in Manufacturing. He currently teaches at the Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts. He received a doctorate in applied mathematics from the Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s and master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Cambridge.

The Wilkes University Family Business Alliance was developed by regional business owners and is a member-driven organization that aims to enable local family businesses to maintain and grow a profitable business and successfully transfer management and ownership to the next generation. The alliance provides its members with executive educational programs, enhanced networking opportunities with fellow family business owners, a forum to discuss common issues and concerns, and exposure to nationally recognized experts to ensure that the businesses’ needs are constantly identified and addressed.

Warning: Healthy treats not so beneficial

Fruit Smoothies

Some studies show that raisins or cereal bars and drinks like smoothies or fruit juices can be as damaging to teeth as soda, according to a recent report in DentistryToday.com

Many treats that claim to be healthy options may contain excessive amount of sugar or high acidity levels, which cause enamel damage.

There are cases where children end up with some type of tooth decay, even though the child’s parents took measures to prevent it.

This information shows that water may generally be the best beverage for children to drink, even instead of apple juice. The problems will likely be exacerbated if the child doesn’t visit the dentist on a regular basis.

For the full story: http://dentistrytoday.com/todays-dental-news/10648-some-healthy-treats-may-be-harmful?utm_content=buffer66128&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Seven freebies to help you live app-ily ever after.

Trying to pinpoint the time suck in your day? Can't remember the 25 passwords for your phone, bank, workstation, email, et al? Want to post your dental practice Instagram photos automatically to your Facebook page? Struggling to find a method to organize the madness of your work and home to-do lists?

 

95 years and counting.

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There’s a party going on in Louisville, Kentucky.

It’s a celebration of the little “Whip-Mixer” that could.

In 1919, Whip Mix created the first complete dental inlay investment casting unit – with a mechanical spatulator that whipped and mixed better than anything else. An invention so dramatic it changed the industry. And formed their company name.

It all started because a young man, Edmund Steinbock, was about to be displaced from his position at Isaac Bernheim Distilling Company at the beginning of what became a 13-year dry spell in the industry known as Prohibition.

According to Allen Steinbock’s history of Whip Mix, “young Ed met Dr. Louis C. Burgard, a dentist from across the Ohio River in Jeffersonville, Indiana who had just patented a “glorified egg beater” that whipped and mixed water together with his secret,  gypsum-bonded refractory investment and resulted in a creamy mixture that poured easily and completely around a wax pattern, set to a dense solid  and could then be burned out and cast in Dr. Burgard’s other equipment that was still being patented. The entire process was called lost wax casting which had been patented in 1907 by Dr. William Taggart of Illinois and which was becoming widely used (and copied) in the dental field.”

Edmund Steinbock and his brothers licensed the system, manufactured and presented it to dentists and through their successes reincorporated their company in 1926 under its current name, Whip-Mix Corporation, Inc.

Other products were added to the line (a tradition that continues today) and 95 years later, Steinbock descendants –along with 230 team members –develop, produce, sell and ship products around the globe.

Find out more about them at http://whipmix.com/news/

Are ‘hard core’ workouts hard on your teeth?

f you're preparing for a marathon, American Ninja Warrior or anything that requires an average of 9 hours of athletic training per week, you might want to pay extra attention to your teeth.

If you’re preparing for a marathon, American Ninja Warrior or anything that requires an average of 9 hours of athletic training per week, you might want to pay extra attention to your teeth.

New York Times story by Gretchen Reynolds suggests that erosion of tooth enamel, cavities and other oral health problems may be linked to exercise.

Heavy training may contribute to dental problems in unexpected ways, according to a study published in The Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, Reynolds reports.

Research completed through the dental school at University Hospital Heidelberg in Germany and other institutions compared 35 competitive triathletes and 35 healthy adults who were not athletes.

According to Reynolds’ report on the athletes: “During their experimental runs, the amount of saliva that they produced progressively lessened, meaning that their mouths became drier, regardless of whether they consumed water or other beverages during the workout. The saliva’s chemical composition also shifted, growing more alkaline as the workout continued. Excess alkalinity in saliva is thought to contribute to the development of tartar plaques on teeth and other problems.”

How do athletes’ consumption of sugary sports drinks and bars factor in? Read the full story at:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/24/is-exercise-bad-for-your-teeth/?_php=true&_type=blogs&smprod=nytcore-ipad&smid=nytcore-ipad-share&_r=0