So happy they could spit.

Luzerne County Community College dental hygiene students in Pennsylvania recently took first place at the first annual Benco Board Bowl, according to citizensvoice.com.
Shown, first row, from left, are Erica Beaver, Berwick; Stephanie Kimble, Charleston, Va.; Kaitlyn Raup, Danville, and Marcy Bronsburg, Wilkes-Barre. Second row: Holly Dottle, Carbondale; Ariel Allen, Kingston; Renae Novitski, Kingston, and Stephanie Rodzinak, Plains. Third row: Lisa Robins, Plymouth; Amy Gulla, West Pittston; Lauren Castelli, Archbald, and Ashley Bieber, Berwick. Fourth row, Lloyd Mordan, Muncy Valley; Jennifer Jones, Bloomsburg; and Jarrod Swingle, Simpson.
CAPTION: Luzerne County Community College dental hygiene students in Pennsylvania recently took first place – and a mounted cuspidor trophy – at the first annual Benco Board Bowl. Shown above, first row, from left, are: Erica Beaver, Berwick; Stephanie Kimble, Charleston, Va.; Kaitlyn Raup, Danville, and Marcy Bronsburg, Wilkes-Barre. Second row: Holly Dottle, Carbondale; Ariel Allen, Kingston; Renae Novitski, Kingston, and Stephanie Rodzinak, Plains. Third row: Lisa Robins, Plymouth; Amy Gulla, West Pittston; Lauren Castelli, Archbald, and Ashley Bieber, Berwick. Fourth row, Lloyd Mordan, Muncy Valley; Jennifer Jones, Bloomsburg; and Jarrod Swingle, Simpson.
Students from Luzerne County Community College took first place at the first annual competition, sponsored by the Northeast PA Dental Hygiene Association, according to a story published today at CitizensVoice.com.The competition was held in Pittston, Pennsylvania, at the corporate headquarters of Benco Dental, the largest privately-owned dental distribution company in the United States. Sixty-four dental hygiene students from six colleges participated in the event.

$4,000 to spare? If not, you’d better stop nail biting.

The Academy of General Dentistry estimates that frequent nail biters may rack up $4,000 in additional dental bills over the course of their lifetime, according to a recent article by bestselling author Dr. James Mercola.

The Academy of General Dentistry estimates that frequent nail biters may rack up $4,000 in additional dental bills over the course of their lifetime, according to a recent article by bestselling author Dr. James Mercola.

That’s quite a bite in the budget.

He notes that the habit can “interfere with proper dental occlusion, or the manner in which your upper and lower teeth come together when you close your mouth. Teeth may shift out of their proper position, become misshapen, wear down prematurely, and become weakened if you bite your nails over time.”

Although 2012, the American Psychiatric Association decided to re-classify nail biting as a form of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the pioneer for alternative medicine suggests that other research in young adults link the habit most frequently to stress and boredom.

A few tips Dr. Mercola offers to block the biting:

* Wrap fingertips with Band-Aids or electrical tape

* Knitting

* Put unpleasant tasting substances on fingertips such as vinegar, hot sauce or commercially available bitter-tasting options.

Read other options at: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/07/26/nail-biting.aspx#_edn4

Cheek biters are not off the hook.

According to huffingtonpost.com columnist Thomas P. Connelly, D.D.S., cheek biters may be susceptible to mouth sores.  The NYC cosmetic dentist noted that because this habit could be a symptom of misaligned teeth, which can lead to  TMJ (temporomandibular joint disorder) and headaches. He advised addressing the cause of the cheek chew.

Find out the recommended fixes for this issue at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/thomas-p-connelly-dds/cheek-biting-_b_818047.html

Money isn’t everything.

moneytooth

The philosophy tends to ring true in all areas of life. Two trends in dentistry illustrate the point.

A career as a dental assistant was ranked No.1 by Forbes.com in a 2012 listing of the best jobs for young people in the current market. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median salary for a Dental Assistant is $34,500 per year, however and this week’s report from marketwatch.com discusses a new DentalPost Survey which reveals the average annual salary for a full-time Dental Assistant is closer to $27,000.

DentalPost Founder and CEO, Tonya Lanthier offered thoughts on the 20 percent disparity to marketwatch.com, “Through our Dental Assistant Survey, we learned that while workplace realities may differ slightly than industry reports, this occupation remains one of the fastest growing in the dental industry and talent continues to be in high demand.”

The survey, which polled more than 500 DentalPost users on topics including salary information, workplace benefits and employment longevity,  revealed that the average full time Dental Assistant worked between 36 and 37 hours a week, earning between $24,000 and $27,000 per year, depending on experience. In contrast, the average part time Dental Assistant works between 24 and 26 hours a week, earning between $19,000 and $22,000 per year.

Ch_ch_ch_ch_changes.

On mypetsdentist.com Dale Kressin DVM, FAVD, Dipl AVDC, illustrates on his canine patient Animal Dentistry & Oral Surgery Specialists LLC, that by creating room, the lower canine teeth can fit without causing trauma to the palate.

Way back in 2011 (The Occupy Wall Street Era) the Chicago Dental Society surveyed more than 300 members to find out the strangest dental requests they’d ever received from patients. Less than three years later, No. 1 on the list “Can you give my dog braces?” becomes common practice.

“Misaligned teeth can poke into your pup’s cheek, gums or tongue, causing him great pain and, potentially, infection,” according to dogcare.dailypuppy.com.

For that reason and others, Animal Dentistry & Oral Surgery Specialists LLC in Wisconsin, along with numerous practitioners across the U.S., offer orthodontics for dogs.

Dale Kressin DVM, FAVD, Dipl AVDC, on the website mypetsdentist.com, explains that ethical considerations; a pet’s temperament; owner expectations needs and time limitations all factor in to treatment plan @MyPetsDentist

At his practice, they use oral surgery, incline planes, other orthodontic appliances and braces to treat their patients safely.

Getting back to @Chicago_Dental survey responses, there’s no denying some of the Top 10 still warrant an eye roll (see list below), but dog braces are here to stay.

As far as the rest of the 2011 “Strangest Dental Request” list, well, in the words of 1989 film “Say Anything” high school valedictorian Diane Court: “I have glimpsed our future and all I can say is go back!”

10) “Can you extract my tooth without anesthesia?”

9) “Please wire my mouth shut to aid in my diet.”

8) “Can you ID this set of dentures left in the bathroom of the bar I work at?”

7) “I will pay you or your hygienist to floss my teeth at my office every day.”

6) “Pull all my teeth, and just give me dentures.”

5) “I just broke off my engagement. Can you prepare my tooth so that I can keep the diamond in it?”

4) “Will you give me local anesthesia in my lips? I’m going in for permanent “lipstick” tattoos on my lips, and would like to avoid the pain.”

3) “May I have an emergency cleaning visit? It’s my high school reunion and I need a bright, white smile to face my old boyfriend.”

2) “Can I keep the teeth you pull out of my mouth? I’d like to make a necklace out of them.”

 

Big efforts for tiny teeth: On Tooth Fairies, generous and bankrupt.

Children's author and illustrator Carolyn Mandache said she was inspired to create short story The Bankrupt Tooth Fairy because she has four young children at home, "three of whom are rapidly losing their baby teeth...an expensive business for parents!"
http://carolynmandache.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-bankrupt-tooth-fairy.html

CAPTION: Children’s author and illustrator Carolyn Mandache created short story The Bankrupt Tooth Fairy, shown above.

Global entities and blogging moms — all doing their part to keep tiny teeth intact.

The Septodont donation of over 1,000 Toothfairy™ Pit & Fissure Sealant Kits and Oraverse® was distributed to America’s ToothFairy Affiliate clinical programs reaching at-risk children across the US with vital oral health services. - See more at: http://www.dentalaegis.com/news.php?id=15451#sthash.3oGzXSWc.dpuf

The Septodont donation of over 1,000 Toothfairy™ Pit & Fissure Sealant Kits and Oraverse® was distributed to America’s ToothFairy Affiliate clinical programs reaching at-risk children across the US with vital oral health services. – See more at: http://www.dentalaegis.com/news.php?id=15451#sthash.3oGzXSWc.dpuf

Septodont, the world’s largest dental anesthetic manufacturer,  has generously donated more than $138,000 in sealant and anesthesia reversal products to National Children’s Oral Health Foundation: America’s ToothFairy® (NCOHF) to help save young smiles, according to a report by dentalaegis.com.  The America’s ToothFairy Affiliate network consists of community-based, non-profit programs throughout North America dedicated to providing the best educational, preventive and treatment services for vulnerable children and families.

Another international effort: Glasgow-based children’s author and illustrator @carolynmandache said a short story she created, The Bankrupt Tooth Fairy, aims to be fun and entertaining, “whilst at the same time encouraging children to look after their teeth.” Her humorous tone evolves from her four young children, “three of whom are rapidly losing their baby teeth…an expensive business for parents.”

Read more about Septodont’s donation here: http://www.dentalaegis.com/news.php?id=15451

Get a glimpse of Carolyn Mandache’s creativity here: http://carolynmandache.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-bankrupt-tooth-fairy.html

 

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